Tevita Taumoepeau to make 150th appearance for Worcester

first_img2 Chris Fortey3 Tevita Taumoepeau4 Graham Kitchener5 Craig Gillies6 Neil Best7 James Collins8 Kai HorstmannReplacements16 Aleki Lutui17 Bruce Douglas18 Greg Rawlinson19 Adam Balding20 Ollie Frost Tevita Taumoepeau of Worcester Warriors is tackled by Ernst Joubert of SaracensPowerhouse prop Tevita Taumoepeau will play his 150th game for Worcester Warriors as the team looks to maintain their perfect start to the RFU Championship play-offs with an away trip to Nottingham Rugby on Friday night (kick-off 7.45pm).Taumoepeau, who has become a huge fan’s favourite during his six year stay at Sixways, will hit the memorable milestone as Head Coach Richard Hill makes three changes to the starting line-up that defeated London Welsh last weekend.Hill calls-up prop loosehead prop Adam Black and vastly experienced hooker Chris Fortey to join Taumoepeau in the front row for the game at Meadow Lane. Scotland international Alex Grove will also start his first game in the play-offs as he partners Alex Crockett in midfield. Crockett moves to inside centre while Dale Rasmussen will provide firepower from the replacements bench.Hill praised the contribution of Taumoepeau during his Worcester career and admitting the Tongan giant was now making even more impact for the Warriors. “Tevita is an extremely strong man who very rarely budges in the scrum – everyone in world rugby knows that is his main asset,” he said.“However, what we have seen this season is him develop his all-round game. He has worked exceptionally hard and been very disciplined with his diet, as a result he has lost any excess body fat and really honed down. Tevita is in very good shape and his mobility around the pitch is better and he is having the ball far more. There is still much more to come from him.”“I have been delighted with his efforts at this stage of his career and we all wish him the best as he reaches another milestone in his time at Warriors.” added Coach Richard HillWarriors team to play Nottingham Rugby15 Chris Pennell (c)14 Marcel Garvey13 Alex Grove12 Alex Crockett11 Miles Benjamin10 Andy Goode9 Jonny Arr1 Adam Black LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS 21 Joe Carlisle22 Dale Rasmussen WORCESTER, ENGLAND – NOVEMBER 27: Tevita Taumoepeau of Worcester Warriors is tackled by Ernst Joubert of Saracens during the Guinness Premiership match between Worcester Warriors and Saracens at Sixways Stadium on November 27, 2009 in Worcester, England. (Photo by Paul Gilham/Getty Images) last_img read more

Sireli keen for Chiefs to make the semi-finals

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS EXETER, ENGLAND – NOVEMBER 6 : Sireli Naqelevuki of Exeter Chiefs in action during the LV Anglo Welsh Cup match between Exeter Chiefs and London Wasps at Sandy Park Stadium on November 6, 2010 in Exeter, England. (Photo by Jan Kruger/Getty Images) Sireli Naqelevuki of Exeter ChiefsSireli Naqelevuki is confident Exeter Chiefs will build on their impressive debut season in the Aviva Premiership and become an even stronger force within the 2011/12 campaign.The 30-year-old Fijian was a key figure for the Devon club in the top flight last term, scoring five tries in 18 appearances following his move from South African Super Rugby franchise ‘The Stormers’ back in September.Initially handed a starting role on the wing for his new club, the Chiefs coaching staff soon realised the attacking potential of the Suva-born back as they switched him into the Exeter midfield where he became a destructive threat both in attack and defence.Now, Naqelevuki is hoping to pick up from where he left off and help Rob Baxter’s side get off to a flying start in the Aviva Premiership. He said: “I had a nice break and it was good to go back home. I didn’t do too much, I just chilled out; had some fun, did a bit of training and I got married as well! At the same time it’s good to be back in Exeter and seeing the boys working hard. You can see they’ve all been training well during the off season and now we’re all getting ready for the start of the season.”Certainly having Naqelevuki on board for the start of the new season, which kicks-off with a trip to Leicester Tigers on September 2, is something the Chiefs will be delighted with. Last term the Fijian international missed the opening few weeks of the season and it was not until Exeter’s trip to Northampton Saints in early October that the club were at last able to unleash his talents.“It’s good to be here at this stage,” said Naqelevuki. “I know it’s going to be a lot of hard work, but I am sure we will have some fun as well. It’s good to see the boys working hard – to have a good season you know you have to work hard in the off season and that is what we are doing. It’s looking good so far. “Last season was enjoyable for all of us. I had some good times and it was nice to finish our first season in eighth place. It was a good test for all of us in the first year, but hopefully we can go one step up further this year and maybe try and qualify for the semi-finals. It is always good to push yourself and set targets like that.”Exeter clearly showed during their maiden year in the Premiership that they could tackle the very best the division had to offer. Not only were they the only side to defeat eventual champions Saracens on their own turf, but they also claimed notable home scalps in Northampton Saints, Harlequins and London Wasps.“There were lots of good memories, but winning against teams like Saracens, Northampton and Harlequins was especially good. I also thought my game came on a lot, I was adding new things all the time. English rugby was a lot different to what I was playing with the Stormers, it is a lot more physical at the breakdown, but it is good to have that kind of competition. It makes you go harder at every ruck.”And whilst many familiar faces remain within the Chiefs ranks this season, Naqelevuki is encouraged by what Baxter has added to the playing ranks during the summer. “It is good to have the new boys in town,” he added. “We all know we have to fight for our position, nobody has a guaranteed place, so it should drive us all on to do well in training and when we play.”First up for Naqelevuki and the Chiefs, however, will be the forthcoming trip to face Irish side Connacht in their opening pre-season clash on Saturday, August 13.last_img read more

Hotshot: Glasgow Hawks half-back George Horne

first_imgDate of birth 12 May 1995. Country Scotland When did you start taking rugby seriously?When I was going into high school. I had played it in Primary Four and with Howe of Fife rugby club, and my dad had always coached my brother Pete at school. It’s not like he forced me to play – I wanted to, especially growing up watching Pete do so well.You play fly-half for Hawks and at No 9 for Scotland U20. Is that hard?Well, I was always a ‘first receiver’ at minis rugby, and then I went on to be a fly-half. Scotland decided to move me to scrum-half. It’s nice to be trusted. Hopefully I’m doing okay!Your brother is a full Scotland cap, so does he give you any help?Pete’s always given advice. He’s seen a couple of my Hawks games and we reviewed some of my games at ten.You had wins with Scotland U20 and fought relegation with Hawks. Was that strange?Coming from the U20 Six Nations (in 2015), we were on a massive high, but then Hawks had to play Stirling in a relegation battle. It was different but a good experience. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS A player and a half: George Horne in Scotland U20 action. (Photo: Getty Images) center_img RW Verdict: He’s been training with brother Pete at Glasgow Warriors and, with his fine kicking from the tee, has excelled in a dozen games for Scotland U20. Expect to see himfeature in the Pro12 in the near future.First published in the September 2015 edition of Rugby World magazine. Who do you model your game on?Nowadays I look at a No 9 like Aaron Smith. He’s not the biggest, but the way he gets about is impressive and he runs the best support lines in the game. When I was a stand-off growing up, the obvious inspiration was Dan Carter. He plays as if he has the ball on a string, he’s mastered everything. And George Ford with England is a great young player.What do you want to achieve off the field?I was studying PE at Edinburgh University, but I deferred that for the U20 World Cup and Six Nations. Maybe now I’ll do a part-time course or Open University.last_img read more

French rugby enjoys a popularity boom as it looks to the future

first_imgFor the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here 2. Have a long-term development plan3. Come from a suitable economic and demographic region that’s able to sustain a professional club.Three ‘wildcard’ clubs will earn promotion to the ProD2 over three seasons and then in 2020-21 a third professional league will be launched on the same lines as the ProD2. By this date the LNR is confident the Federale 1 clubs will be professional and capable of fulfilling all the relevant criteria for accession to the ProD2 in the event of promotion.Other initiatives announced by the LNR include the establishment of a women’s championship involving teams from all of the Top 14 and ProD2 clubs, and the creation of a professional Sevens circuit.Sevens growth: Virimi Vakatawa will be much sought-after with the introduction of a Sevens circuitFew details were offered on the women’s championship but the Sevens circuit is scheduled to launch in 2017-18 featuring sides from every Top 14 club plus “a guest team”. Initially it will comprise five tournaments in different cities or towns but this number will be increased to seven in due course. Goze said that he expects teams to field sides that will be a mix of senior stars and academy players. As for the guest side, Goze said “We’ll see how the fifteenth side is composed. We have several ideas but nothing has been finalised.”Aware of the possible objections from Top 14 presidents, many of whom are never slow to pick a fight with the LNR over the structure of the season, Goze added: “The dates will be chosen in such a way as to cause the least possible disruption [to the Top 14]. and to maximise media interest.” Asked which cities are likely to hose the Sevens series, he replied: “Cities which are not for the moment rugby cities because the goal is also to promote our sport.”The LNR has set aside 28m euros to implement its strategic plan, a plan bristling with ambition. The times they are a-changing in the rugby world and the French are at the forefront of the innovation On the up: Racing 92 lift the Bouclier de Brennus LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img The Top 14’s governing body, the LNR, have drawn up ambitious plans to further strengthen rugby’s popularity with the French public The Ligue Nationale de Rugby (LNR) launched its ‘strategic plan’ on Tuesday, outlining its vision for the sport in France up to and including the 2023 World Cup.Before president Paul Goze got down to details, some statistics were served up to illustrate how rugby in France has grown since the country hosted the 2007 World Cup.In the 2015-16 season, a total of 3.8m supporters attended Top 14 and ProD2 matches. Spectator numbers in the Top 14 have increased 40% in the past decade, rising to 68% for the ProD2. Also on the increase are club budgets. The average budget of a Top 14 club in the last ten years has rocketed 140%, from 9.67m euros to 23.38m, and its 100% for the ProD2 sides, from 3.02m euros to 6.19m.Power-broker: Paul Goze (right) is seeking re-election with wide-ranging plans for French rugbyAccording to the LNR, 18,8m of France’s 66m population now profess to “be interested in rugby” with over 11m living in the northern half the country [defined as a line running east to west from Lyon to La Rochelle]. So to sum up: rugby has never been so popular and Monsieur Goze – who is up for re-election in October – intends to capitalise.Getting down to business, the LNR president confirmed that as of 2017-18, only the club finishing bottom in the Top 14 will be automatically relegated to the ProD2, their place taken by the champions of the second division. The 13th club in the Top 14 will play the runners-up in the ProD2 with the winner playing in the top-flight the following season.Additionally, as of 2017-18, the ProD2 season with culminate with a play-off system identical to that of the Top 14, instead of the current format that pits 2nd v 5th and 3rd v 4th with the winners meeting the following week. That means the top two at the end of the regular season will automatically go into the semi-final, while teams finishing third to sixth will play-off in a quarter-final with the winners progressing to the semis.Star appeal: The riches in the Top 14 have brought the likes of Ma’a Nonu to FranceFrom the 2017-18 season the ProD2 will also see a change in how clubs from the amateur Federale 1 are promoted to their ranks. Currently, the two clubs that win their semi-finals don’t contest a final but are promoted to ProD2. From next year onwards there will be a final with the winner being promoted; the club that joins them will be what the LNR described on Tuesday as a “wildcard”. These ‘wildcard’ clubs, who will each receive 800,000 euros from the LNR to assist in their transition from an amateur to a professional club, will be selected on three criteria. They must:1. Be situated in the north of Francelast_img read more

Talking points from the European semi-finals

first_img TAGS: HighlightLeinsterMunsterSaracens Any old romantics will surely not begrudge one of rugby’s great club sides, Clermont, on embarking on their Holy Grail of a Champions Cup winning medal, after two final losses, and countless semi-final heartbreaks.Top class: The Clermont fans will add plenty of colour to Edinburgh next monthThe vibrant yellow-clad fans, saw an adopted-Englishman David Strettle, set up the first try with a delicate chip, before he rounded Dan Leavy on the touchline to score – in front of a watching Stuart Lancaster – before Camille Lopez and Morgan Parra penalties guided them home. A sloppy first-half left Leinster with too much to do, leaving Clermont to ponder whether this can be their year? The Champions and Challenge Cup semi-finals were decided at the weekend and left fans either elated or crestfallen. Here are the game’s talking points… LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img …while Bath are left to rue costly mistakesBath showed admirable resolve to overcome a 18-6 deficit against Stade Francais, with three tries in eight minutes in the last quarter – the pick of them Semesa Rokoduguni’s power fend and sublime finish to start the comeback. When they went 25-18 up with nine minutes to go, a famous comeback seemed assured, yet a break from Djibril Camara down the flank set-up Aussie lock Hugh Pyle to gallop over the line from distance and Plisson levelled the scores.Not his day: George Ford will rue a stoppage-time penalty missGeorge Ford’s short restart saw Stade regaining all-important field territory and ended with a Plisson drop-goal. Ford had a chance to level the scores but pushed his late, late kick wide of the right-hand uprights as the game was lost. It gives Stade – whose very future was in doubt last month – the chance to add silverware after a tumultuous season.Ringrose forcing comparisons with O’DriscollMuch of the chat at the Lions squad announcement was about Garry Ringrose’s huge potential, with Andy Farrell commenting that in six months, Leinster and Ireland could have quite a player on their hands. Shorten that to less than six days, for the brilliant 60m individual score from the young Dubliner was enough to leave many commentators wondering if a place had to be found for the 22-year-old.Star quality: Garry Ringrose scored a brilliant individual score against ClermontWith Leinster 21-12 down, Ringrose ducked under a tackle, stepped Damian Penaud and Damien Chouly before dummying a flailing Scott Spedding and outpacing the covering Clermont defence – in a not dissimilar score to BOD’s at the Gabba in 2001 for the Lions. At the merest hint of a hamstring tweak in midfield, Ringrose will surely be called upon.Les Jaunards march on Murrayfield Saracens out-Munster, MunsterOver the years, we’ve witnessed the irrepressible red wave overcome lesser teams, yet no matter how many big ball carriers they sent down Saracens’ channel, Munster could not puncture the aggressive defensive line, held firm by Maro Itoje, Vincent Koch, Billy and Mako Vunipola and Michael Rhodes. By the time CJ Stander burrowed over, the clock was tipping into the red and the result was beyond doubt after 26-unanswered points.Black wall: Billy Holland finds no way through an impenetrable Saracens defenceRassie Erasmus, who has seen such progress this season, gave fans reason to cheer after committing his immediate future to Thomond Park but he was both magnanimous and pragmatic in defeat, “the reality at this stage is that Saracens are 15 to 20 points better than us. Hopefully in a year’s time we’ll be closer.”All hail the best club in EuropeThis is Saracens’ third European Cup final in four years, and while we hailed Toulon and their trio of trophies, similar fulsome praise should go Sarries’ way if they manage the same feat. Many have scoffed at their modest travelling support, but with continual success, the expanding supporter-base will come.Solidarity: Saracens have built up an admirable culture over the yearsThe age-profile at Sarries bodes well. All six of their Lions have their best years ahead of them; Itoje, 22, Billy Vunipola, 24, Jamie George 26, Owen Farrell 25, George Kruis 27 and Mako Vunipola 26, and with another, Liam Williams, on his way, the good times promise to continue. Vunipola summed it up in a post-match interview, “Everybody seems to hate us but if you’re part of the squad you’ll love it and won’t want to leave.” As the squad head to Barcelona to recharge, it’s hard to argue with that.Gloucester hold up their side of the bargain…The Challenge Cup organisers must have been relishing an all-West Country final in Edinburgh but alas, it wasn’t to be, however, Gloucester, so often a side that has a habit of snatching defeat from the jaws of victory, dug in against a La Rochelle outfit that stands atop of the Top 14, for a gutsy 16-14 victory.Billy Whizz: Billy Burns shows of creditable pace as he runs in an interceptionThey may have thank Brock James’ errant kicking boots, sending a key conversion and penalty wide of the posts, but Glaws were worthy of their victory, with Billy Burns scampering away for a breakaway try a highlight. It was enough to send their loyal fans giddy. Feeling light headed for another reason, was Richard Hibbard, who had to take a blow to the crown jewels for his trouble. Stade Francais await.last_img read more

Eddie Jones exclusive interview inside the new Rugby World magazine

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS As well as talking to the England coach, we look ahead to the European quarter-finals in the October 2020 issue TAGS: Highlight 6. Pat Lam’s Life in PicturesThe Bristol Bears boss has packed a lot into his 30 years as an elite-level player and coach. Here he reflects on the key moments7. Northampton Saints scrumRW’s Alan Dymock gets an insight into the club’s new front-row philosophy by talking to those involved on and off the pitchBreak time: Rory Sutherland on the charge for Scotland in the Six Nations (Getty Images)8. Scotland prop Rory SutherlandConcealing the truth paid off in the end for the Edinburgh prop – RW’s Alan Pearey finds out more about his life-changing secret in this one-on-one interview9. Leicester Tigers analysis“The rise of the Fox has compounded the fall of the Tiger.” Stuart Barnes looks at the contrasting fortunes of Leicester’s two clubs10. Dragons wing Jonah HolmesHaving swapped Leicester for Newport, the back-three player is setting new goalsMove up: Former Wales scrum-half Dwayne Peel is now part of Ulster’s coaching team (Getty Images)11. Player to coachThe transition from playing squad to back-room team is a path well trodden. But there are different routes to take, as Sam Larner finds out by talking to five men who’ve done it12. South Africa wing Cheslin Kolbe“In a game that’s often suffocating, he brings oxygen.” A look at why the speedster has made such an impact at Toulouse as well as for the world championscenter_img Eddie Jones exclusive interview inside the new Rugby World magazineEngland coach Eddie Jones covers baseball, cricket and, of course, rugby in his in-depth interview in the new issue of Rugby World magazine.As well as that exclusive, we look ahead to the knockout stages of both the European Champions and Challenge Cups in the October 2020 edition.If you can’t get to the shops to buy a copy, you can now order single issues online and get the magazine delivered direct to your door – click here and select Rugby World’s Oct-20 issue.Or you can find out how to download the digital edition to your tablet here. We also have incredible subscription offers, including three issues for just £5 – find out more here.Here are a dozen reasons to buy Rugby World magazine’s October 2020 edition…1. Eddie Jones exclusive interviewThe England head coach talks selection, statistics and sleeping at his desk in a wide-ranging interviewThe prize! Who will lift the Champions Cup trophy in 2020? (Getty Images)2. European quarter-final previewsThe Champions and Challenge Cups knockout stages are back on the horizon after a six-month delay. Stephen Jones looks ahead to the last-eight ties and makes his predictions3. The future of sevensFormer England Sevens captain Rob Vickerman on how to fine-tune the abbreviated format to make it more sustainable4. Scarlets centre Johnny WilliamsGet to know the powerful new addition to the Scarlets back-lineEyes on the prize: Tadhg Furlong is chasing more trophies with Leinster (Getty Images)5. Ireland prop Tadhg FurlongWhether on the rugby pitch or the family farm, the Leinster front-rower is always looking ahead to the next challenge – and right not that means Europe Plus, there’s all this…Analysis of how Alex King’s kick strategy will spark GloucesterClub Hero: Racing 92 captain Henry ChavancyChiefs back-row Lachlan Boshier gives his top turnover tipsDowntime with Canada captain Tyler ArdronWhat it’s like to… start a Premier 15s team during CovidInside the mind of… Felipe ContepomiSean Fitzpatrick on joining the Scarlets board and why rugby must changeRising Stars Anton Segner and Robert BaloucouneThe October 2020 issue of Rugby World magazine is on sale from 1 September to 5 October 2020.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

From Texas to Tanzania, Anglican hospitals link up

first_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit an Event Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Collierville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Tampa, FL Rector Knoxville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Albany, NY Submit a Job Listing Anglican Communion Rector Martinsville, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem [Anglican Communion News Service] Senior management and medical officers from St. Luke’s Episcopal Health System Houston and Baylor College of Medicine will visit the hospital of the Diocese of Morogoro in Berega, Tanzania, at the end of February. This is the first step in a program to develop links between Anglican hospitals in different parts of the world. These links are designed to provide conduits for the supply of medical equipment, provision of clinical training, and development in hospital management systems.“The profile of Anglican hospitals is rising both within the church and amongst health policy makers,” said Lee Hogan, co-chair of the Anglican Health Network and organizer of this trip. “Strengthening links between these hospitals will support our common mission to bring improved health care to those communities that Anglicans serve.”Following a trip to Berega in May 2011, Lee recruited officers from St. Luke’s and Baylor who can provide key skills and experience to address priorities outlined by hospital director Isaac Mgego. At the top of the list is the development of maternal and newborn services. A high percentage of women in this rural district give birth at home without any medical supervision. Dr. Kjersti Aagaard, professor of fetal and maternal Health at Baylor College of Medicine has extensive experience throughout Africa and will give attention to this challenge.John and Mair Pugh run the associated nursing school. Cheryl Lindy, director of nurse education for St. Luke’s will share her experience in international nurse exchange programs and learn from them about the methods by which local nurses can be recruited and trained.Other visitors include Dr. John Joe, chief medical information officer at St. Luke’s who has experience in both family medicine and general surgery and has participated in previous medical missions in both South East Asia and Africa. Debbie Mahannah, vice president for human resources will be working on a variety of Anglican Health Network programs including the supply of surplus medical equipment from hospitals of the Episcopal Church. This trip will help her to establish relationships and systems within Tanzania to assist in getting the deliveries moving.The Anglican Health Network is encouraging Anglican hospitals throughout the communion to recognize the value of collaboration and mutual learning. For further information on this and other programs operated by AHN, check out the following weblink. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Bath, NC Featured Events Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Jobs & Calls Curate Diocese of Nebraska Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Africa, This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Tags Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Belleville, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 From Texas to Tanzania, Anglican hospitals link up Posted Jan 20, 2012 last_img read more

Occupy movement prepares for May 1; Episcopalians continue support

first_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Wayne Kempton says: Jim Hunt says: Submit an Event Listing Occupy Movement The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Knoxville, TN The Rev. Al Minor says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 April 20, 2012 at 11:29 pm Sadly, the more trouble the Occupy Movement causes this year, the higher is the chance of a Republican sweep in the fall. Independents and centrists are going to look at he Occupiers the way they looked at the student demonstrators in 1968, as socialist-nihilists. Then, we got Nixon. Now we’ll get Romney and a GOP Congress, as surely as night follows day. Shane Patrick Connolly says: Submit a Press Release April 24, 2012 at 12:00 pm Is there room at the Communion table in the Episcopal Church for those whose political views are opposed to Occupy? Can we accept that some disagree with us, or shall we continually be in liberal conversion mode? This article would seem to imply the latter. Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ April 25, 2012 at 4:28 pm This is outrageous. Do not pretend to lump all Episcopalians in as supporters of this nonsensical outfit. I respectfully ask you to keep your personal political views away from legitimate Church news. The fact that this appears on the Episcopal News Service website and purports to have support from all Episcopalians is insulting and appalling. I for one find this group to be lazy and unrealistic and essentially a group of spoiled children trying to get their way by making a loud fuss and bucking conventional society. My suggestion for OWS “protesters” is to seek gainful employment and pursue the American Dream. I would hope that Christ would be in favor of individuals trying to better themselves and provide for their families, not sitting around protesting the fact that they can’t find success in the most bountiful land on God’s green earth. The irony is that for the most part this group is full of secularists that rail against virtually everything that the Church teaches, yet you find their “cause” to be noteworthy. If you can’t see these people for what they are and the Church truly endorses this movement…then God help us. April 21, 2012 at 1:36 am I have been deeply involved in Occupy San Francisco (http://americaoccupied.org/2012/01/19/the-deacon/) since early October, because, by my lights, it seeks the same over-arching goal we say we do – a society that is fair and just and loving…a Beloved Community of Shalom. And, as I have said elsewhere, I feel that it’s urgent for the church get off the sidelines and embrace the Occupy movement. Do we truly believe Jesus’ words and ours? Are we prepared to speak and act – dangerously – on our beliefs? Are we prepared to follow those like Bishop George Packard who are?Young people, in particular, are waiting for our answers and, I assure you, anxious to embrace us. I have found them calling us to do what we as a church should have been doing a long time ago. Are we listening? Are we ready, as people of faith, to act?Probably the biggest excuse for inaction is the contention that it’s all too fuzzy. Over and over – from our bishops and the people in the pews – we hear “What do they want?” Wrong question! The proper question is “What do we want?” Are we in the church not part of the 99%? Do we not have eyes and ears and hearts to see and hear and feel what Stephane Hessel , the French Holocaust survivor and human rights activist, calls the “unbearable things all around us” – the myriad injustices and indignities heaped upon us by out-of-control capitalism and a democracy corrupted by money. Do we not want to convince even the 1% to join a new, more humane consensus? Must we rely on the courageous, dispersed campers who have opened our eyes to those unbearable things to also fill our minds, grown flaccid, with ready-made answers? Have we not minds of our own? Can we not engage? Dare we not join the changed and broadening conversation about necessary and, yes, obvious solutions? Can we not exert ourselves, and, through such exertion, tone up our capacity to think for ourselves and, together, shape our answers. As Hessel writes in Time for Outrage, “The worst attitude is indifference.”There is, indeed, a time when silence is betrayal. We cannot be silent in the face of a patently unfair economy that devours the poor. Nor can we be indifferent to a political system that ignores our pain. We must speak truth to the powers-that-be, be they on Wall Street, Lafayette Square, or Nob Hill. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Tags April 24, 2012 at 5:34 pm I think it should be obvious to Christians that Episcopalians who support a movement dedicated to speaking out for the poor and oppressed against the indifferent and oppressive rich are taking their example from our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. Have you read the Gospel?If you’re an Episcopalian in the Diocese of New York, you really should read the letter from our bishops in support of the Occupy movement. It explains well that the goals of followers of Christ and many of those held by OWS protesters are the same or similar enough for alliance on many issues.Don’t try to use the Bible to justify your selfish or indifferent attitude towards the poor and oppressed. You’re only fooling yourself and/or other people who have bought into the conservative/individualistic lie. Those beliefs are your own – they don’t look anything like what Jesus preached. Rector Belleville, IL Sean McDermott says: Sean McDermott says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 April 20, 2012 at 10:38 pm Here in Auckland, New Zealand, I am trying another tack. “Some sits and thinks, some just sits”. I am starting up a blog, Occupy – E noho! E whaiwhakaaroaro! which means Sit! Think! and asking some economists to help me tell what economic thinkers have taught. I have no special gifts in tht direction apart from having lived through the years when great numbers of people died of hunger because the followers of Karl Marx and Mao Tse Tung couldn’t make their systems work. I have also spent most of my life putting things into simple language in English or Mota or Maori. Since it is the beginning of the academic year here the people I want are very busy, but one professor did tell me that these wealth gap matters do generate a lot of discussion among his students. That is good. Now let’s have some talk out in the real world! Director of Music Morristown, NJ April 23, 2012 at 3:32 pm I found my participation in Occupy Lent and the Stations of the Cross to be the most meaningful spiritual events in my life to date. As to “the Constitution” – let me remind everyone that when ideology met the constitution, the result was Citizens United vs. FEC. Not a very good “date”. April 20, 2012 at 11:13 pm The knee-jerk support given to the anarchist-leftist Occupy movement by some in the Episcopal Church would be laughable if it didn’t so overshadow the true mission of the Church which is to bring the gospel and love of Christ to all people. Some elements of the ECUSA hierarchy seem to have found, in the Occupy movement, a convenient social movement on which to hang their 1960’s-inspired (or perhaps early 20th-century Marxism-inspired?) theology. I really don’t recall Christ calling upon us to promote the shirking of personal responsibility and the expansion of a moribund Federal government to hand out money to whom they deem worthy and of whom no no accountability is required. I don’t see a Biblical injustice perpetrated when requiring someone to pay back their school or home loans. While there is plenty of injustice, Biblical or otherwise, in handing out our tax dollars to the wealthy on Wall Street and to well-connected green-tech Titans, I find it telling that I didn’t see the Occupy-apologist clergy and laity standing with the Tea Party folks who raised such issues. It really exposes these folks for who they are – political activists using the Christian faith as a cover to promote the left-wing ideals they just happen to have in common with the Occupy movement. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem May 1, 2012 at 3:18 pm The occupiers are looking to the Arab Spring / Tahrir Square for their inspiration.http://www.cbsnews.com/2100-18560_162-20058368.html This is your future, Occupy! Your legacy of revolution is the French Revolution (the Great Terror), The Russian Revolution (the Red Terror) and Lara’s rape.Stand in solidarity with the Arab Spring? How’s that working out? The Muslim Brotherhood and affiliated Islamists now have over 70% of Egypt’s government. Please, dear God think through what you’re after. CH Trammell says: Rector Washington, DC Comments are closed. Occupy movement prepares for May 1; Episcopalians continue support Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Collierville, TN Dan Shockley says: Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Comments (15) TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Anna Scott says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Smithfield, NC May 1, 2012 at 8:50 pm These types of blanket statements about Episcopalians are inaccurate and disturbing. I am an Episcopalian, and I do not support the Occupy Movement. Deborah Sirotkin Butler says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Press Release Service April 21, 2012 at 10:55 am Reform movements in America have always begun with “the people” against “the establishment”. In the OWS movement we see it again: people who have little facing down people who have much.Theologically there is nothing wrong with wealth, but it must bear a deep responsibility. “To whom much is given, much is expected.” We might even say REQUIRED: the care of those who are much less fortunate. The Biblical expectation of at least 10% of our wealth be given in worship to God is pretty clear, and the assumption is that very little of this is to go to institutional maintenance and most is to go to the responsible works expressing the care of God for the poor and suffering. This is the beginning standard in the ministries of the Church. The Church, in turn, must give unfailing concern and support to the victims and the CAUSES of injustice, deprivation, and uncaring exploitation.The issues of freedom directly involve the exploitation, victimization and deprivation of the poor by the crafty. Over time the effects of those who bear the messages of the love of God — at whatever levels of their resources of personal or corporate wealth must responsibly become involved. We are our brothers’ keepers and in this we must use our best skills.The OWS movement exposes a dangerous imbalance and immorality in the corporate society. Our national and spiritual health depends on its correction. There will be strife for sure. Somehow, in the life of Christ within us, we must not be afraid. The crucifixions of the just and loving will take place in various degrees and forms. It is to be expected, and it is a form of unaware worship.My highest hope for this growing movement is for a result of major, principled, open and public structures of care for the least fortunate on the part of the most fortunate, including the major corporations; and this before the extraordinary unneeded and greedy benefits of those on the highest rungs of the corporate ladders. I think there are signs of this now beginning. Keep the pressure up. We will all be spiritually healthier for it in this next step in the creation of our world. Featured Events Rector Martinsville, VA Lisa Sullivan says: An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Vicki Gray says: May 1, 2012 at 3:09 pm God Bless you Jeff. I DO support Faith, Hope & Charity. I also support the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, something these neo-Bolsheviks do not. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI April 20, 2012 at 10:17 pm Sharon, count me out when you say, “Episcopalians and other people of faith have supported the movement from the beginning.” I find that to be a careless and irresponsible blanket statement that does not reflect the diverse opinions of Episcopalians. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Jeff Parker says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET By Sharon SheridanPosted Apr 20, 2012 Rector Bath, NC Sean McDermott says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Tampa, FL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis April 23, 2012 at 11:40 am This sort of article is outrageous, inaccurate, and naive. When the USSR trooped all their military might in Red Square on May Day, the US reponded by naming it Law Day. Being spriritual does not mean that their position makes any sense. These comments are ridiculously sweeping. This Episcopalian certainly does not support OWS, and I am insulted by the insinuation that I do. What I do support on the political front is the Constitution. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Occupy movement participants take part in stations of the cross on Good Friday at the Massachusetts State House. Photo/Michael Horan[Episcopal News Service] With the dismantling of encampments at New York’s Zuccotti Park and elsewhere and the onset of winter, the Occupy movement dropped out of front-page headlines. But the movement against greed and economic inequality has continued unabated, supported by members of the faith community.“It’s alive and well. I’ve never seen so much percolation going on. Just today there are four different meetings having to do with five different actions,” retired Episcopal Bishop George Packard said in a March interview with ENS.“Actions” – from street theater to interruptions of foreclosure procedures by singing protestors to weekly Wall Street marches – occur frequently, chronicled on Occupy Wall Street’s Facebook page, website and elsewhere. Earth Day on Sunday in New York, for example, will bring a “jazz funeral for the death of Earth as we know it” and a march to the site of the proposed Spectra Pipeline in the West Village.Faith groups in some cities led Lent or Easter events. In late March, two priests from the Episcopal Diocese of Long Island and the founder of Protest Chaplains in Boston traveled to Oakland, California, to participate in a national Occupy Faith gathering. And movement supporters around the country are planning a day of action, including a call for a general strike, for May 1.“May Day is really going to kick off a whole series of actions that are going to go on this summer,” said the Rev. John Merz, priest-in-charge at the Episcopal Church of the Ascension on Greenpoint, Brooklyn. Leading up to that, every Friday or Saturday brings a march around Wall Street, he said. “There are sleeping bags in front of the [New York] Stock Exchange. There may even be attempts at various reoccupations, whether it’s Zuccotti or elsewhere. That may happen on a mass scale.”May 1, he explained, is “traditionally a day when unions and disparate groups work together to stand up for workers’ rights and the rights of the disadvantaged in society.”Packard, former bishop for the armed forces and federal ministries; Merz; the Rev. Michael Sniffen, priest-in-charge of the Episcopal Church of St. Luke and St. Matthew in Brooklyn; and the Rev. Earl Kooperkamp, rector of St. Mary’s Episcopal Church in Harlem, were among Occupy protesters arrested Dec. 17 after entering a fenced property owned by Trinity Episcopal Church, Wall Street, in Duarte Square in Lower Manhattan as part of Occupy Wall Street’s “D17 Take Back the Commons” event to celebrate three months since the movement’s launch.OWS had been lobbying Trinity to use the property for a winter encampment, following the movement’s Nov. 15 eviction from Zuccotti Park near the church. Trinity had refused, citing a lack of facilities at the site and its lease agreement allowing the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council to use it for periodic art installations. Packard had been trying to mediate an agreement between OWS members and Trinity.Packard and Kooperkamp are due in New York Criminal Court April 20 on trespassing charges. Merz and Sniffen accepted a six-month adjournment in contemplation of dismissal (ACD) on Feb. 28, which means the charges against them will be dismissed and they will have no criminal record if they are not arrested again in the next six months, according to a court official.Packard said he chose not to accept the offered ACD because “I elected to hear my charges from a judge and be able to respond to them.“I didn’t go through all of this just to kind of go out the back of the court with my tail between my legs, he said. “I felt it was time to stand on my own two feet, look the gentleman in the eye [and] say, ‘This is what I did.’”“I also probably will be arrested again,” said Packard, who has continued to participate in OWS actions in New York. “I’m not looking to be arrested, but the chances are pretty high.”Packard’s wife Brook, who was not arrested Dec. 17 but said she feared for her life when police countered OWS demonstrators with force, has continued to be involved in the movement as well, including teaching protest songs to occupiers for the spring marches.Merz also said he accepted the possibility of being arrested again. “I’m not worried about that. … I’ll be at demonstrations and I’ll be out on May Day, and if there’s an attempt at a reoccupation, I’m going to be there.”“Some of these demonstrations, people are getting arrested who are not even involved in the demonstration,” he said. “If you’re involved in some way, it’s a given that you may be arrested.”Being in court brought another lesson in society’s inequities, Sniffen said. “Most of the people in the courtroom where I was were elderly Chinese and Latino women who had been arrested for selling flowers and candy on a street corner. I was just thinking about all of the gross injustices that surround us that many of us are fighting in the church and outside the church to overcome and that the justice system is clogged with people who are desperately trying to scrape a living together. It was really a surprise, and them being given $150 fines, which is probably more than they make in a couple of months.”“I think it’s an indication that our justice system, along with many of our other systems, is also broken,” he said.Involved from the startInspired by the Arab Spring, the Occupy movement was launched Sept. 17 with Occupy Wall Street. Demonstrators set up camp in Zuccotti Park and created a community with everything from an onsite lending library to working groups planning actions and statements on various social and economic concerns. Participants organized using “horizontal” rather than hierarchical leadership and made decisions at democratic “general assemblies.”Other camps arose in cities and towns across the country and around the world, including an encampment outside St. Paul’s Cathedral in London. Within months, authorities broke up most of the encampments.Episcopalians and other people of faith have supported the movement from the beginning. Harvard doctoral candidate Marisa Egerstrom organized a group called Protest Chaplains that participated in the launch at Zuccotti Park and has supported Occupy Boston. In New York, Episcopal clergy, including Diocese of Long Island Bishop Lawrence Provenzano and those arrested Dec. 17, spent time with occupiers at Zuccotti Park and have been involved with Occupy Faith NYC.In late March, Occupy Faith members from across the country – including Merz, Sniffen and Egerstrom – attended a national planning meeting in Oakland, California, where members of various religious groups had maintained an “Interfaith Tent” at Occupy Oakland and 14 were arrested in November after refusing to evacuate that encampment.The Oakland meeting included discussion about national coordination and actions, including what will happen May 1 and a push for a commission on debt and debt culture — “something along the lines of a truth commission around wealth and debt” — Merz said. But it also showed the challenges of a national strategy for a diverse movement.Because there are so many Occupy groups at different stages of development, much of the conference focused on sharing experiences, identifying where the groups were in their development and discussing strategies, he said. Besides providing physical and logistical support, one area in which people saw faith leaders as potentially playing an important role is in direct actions, such as when Occupy Faith NYC members demonstrated in front of the governor’s office using beds to symbolize the impact of budget cuts on homeless people, he said.Since the breakup of the occupations in New York and other cities, said Egerstrom, “the main development is that what used to be a very camp-centered movement has really … turned into collective, I guess, and that collective is made up of working groups and affinity groups who are all now pursuing various strategies but in communication with each other. So it actually looks more like movements we’ve seen in the past than it has previously.”That, in turn, spurs the question: Will the movement dissolve into single-issue groups, “or are we going to continue to be something of a sustained popular uprising?” she said.“In Boston, some of the Protest Chaplains have continued to do various actions,” she said. During Lent, for example, a group gathered every Friday morning outside Bank of America for prayers and music, “not only calling for repentance on the part of banks, but also for all of us to understand how we’re all locked into a system that rests on exploitation and greed.”The Occupy Lent leaders included a Catholic, a Buddhist, a Unitarian, a Lutheran and emergent church Episcopalian. On Ash Wednesday, a UCC minister offered ashes. On Maundy Thursday, a group offered Eucharist and foot washing near a Boston Commons fountain. Good Friday brought a stations of the cross that drew 50 or 60 participants. In Philadelphia, Easter plans included a morning “Sermon at the Mall.”“Occupy is almost mirroring so much of what gets discussed in sort of emergent church discourse,” Egerstrom said. “People don’t want statements or creeds or mission blurbs. … What matters is where you put your body and to what end.“I think Episcopalians would say, ‘Well, it’s all fine and good if you say the creeds and you say that’s what you believe, but aren’t you going to show up to church? Aren’t we going to come together as a community and take part in the sacraments together and experience the sound of all our bodies and voices singing together, praying together?’ And Occupy has also come as a result of people being fed up with the insufficiency of things like signing online petitions, statements from people in positions of authority that don’t go anywhere.”A need for conversation“The camps taught us that there is no substitute for face-to-face conversations,” Egerstrom said. “And the camps taught us that there is nothing that scares the wealthy elite and their institutions more than a collection of people having face-to-face conversations.”Some conversations are taking place at Episcopal seminaries.On April 27, Packard and the Rev. James Cooper, rector of Trinity, Wall Street, will participate in “Occupy Faith – Leadership for the 100%,” a forum focusing on faith and leadership in the Occupy movement, at Virginia Theological Seminary in Alexandria, Virginia. The event is the second in a series of forums sponsored by the Social Concerns Committee highlighting the ongoing impact of the movement.In February, Packard, Merz, Smithen and Egerstrom participated in a forum at General Theological Seminary in New York.In the larger society, although OWS’ encampment only lasted two months, references to the movement and issues raised by Occupy have “just become part of the vocabulary,” Merz said.Within the larger institutional church, he said, he’s “more convinced than ever” that it “will naturally lag behind being a force of any kind of institutional change.”“We unconsciously and consciously perpetuate a lot of the institutional pillars in society, whether it’s family, law and order … Then we preach from the pulpit transformation,” he said. “Experientially, the church is a place that does not welcome transformation actually that openly and easily. You can’t move a pew without getting into an enormous fight.”But, at least in New York, the movement has “pushed some churches into uncomfortable territory,” he said, stressing the need for continued conversations about economic justice and action.May 1 will provide another opportunity, he said. “What will be the response to this? … How will churches respond and see ourselves as partners in pushing the society to answering the questions that we raise week in and week out from out from our pulpits?”Looking outside the church, religious leaders have described a strong spiritual component to the Occupy movement and its encampments from the beginning, even if many participants aren’t religiously affiliated.“The people I meet at OWS … they don’t know anything about institutional religion at all,” Packard said. “They are not less spiritual. They have a spirituality which is undeniable.”— Sharon Sheridan is an ENS correspondent. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Art House says: May 1, 2012 at 3:14 pm As a police officer in L.A. (LAPD) I’m quite horrified that my church sees fit to mix in with and empower those who assemble weapons against me and my brother and sister officers, go to the bathroom on our police cars, rape and murder one another – and no visits at all to police stations!All we have are our chaplains (God Bless them). I do wish Bishop Jon Bruno (a former police officer) would exhibit some Bonhoeffer inspired courage and strength on this matter. Pray for these protestors and denounce their Baal worship. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Job Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, ILlast_img read more

ENS coverage of Archbishop of Canterbury’s enthronement

first_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Video: Designer Juliet Hemingray on the archbishop’s vestments Posted Mar 21, 2013By Matthew Davies Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Submit an Event Listing Video: Presiding Bishop on the enthronement Posted Mar 21, 2013By Matthew Davies Anglicans worldwide invited to pray for their spiritual leader Posted Mar 21, 2013By ACNS staff Archbishop of Canterbury enthroned in ancient splendor Posted Mar 21, 2013By Matthew Davies Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Video: Archbishop Welby arrives at the cathedral’s West Door Posted Mar 21, 2013By Matthew Davies Youth Minister Lorton, VA Video: Connecticut Bishop Ian Douglas on the enthronement Posted Mar 21, 2013By Matthew Davies Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Total: 15 Anglican Communion prepares for Archbishop Welby’s inauguration Posted Mar 20, 2013 By ACNS staff What happens when an archbishop is enthroned? Posted Mar 19, 2013 Rector Albany, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Video: Canon Chuck Robertson on the enthronement Posted Mar 21, 2013By Matthew Davies Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Events Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Job Listing Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Justin Welby Enthronement The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Video: Texas Bishop Andy Doyle on the enthronement Posted Mar 21, 2013By Matthew Davies Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Video: Anglican primates process into Canterbury Cathedral Posted Mar 21, 2013By Matthew Davies Rector Tampa, FL Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Jobs & Calls Order of service for archbishop of Canterbury’s inauguration released Posted Mar 21, 2013 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Video: Rob Radtke on the enthronement Posted Mar 21, 2013By Matthew Davies Cathedral Dean Boise, ID This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Pope Francis sends greetings to new archbishop of Canterbury Posted Mar 21, 2013 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books ‘Out of our own traditions, and into the waves’ Posted Mar 21, 2013 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Bath, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem last_img read more

Video: Episcopal Church helps Iraqi refugees find new life in…

first_imgVideo: Episcopal Church helps Iraqi refugees find new life in Paris Pierre Whalon says: Rector Bath, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Refugees Migration & Resettlement, Rector Collierville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Comments (3) Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate Diocese of Nebraska Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Tampa, FL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Events Rector Pittsburgh, PA Press Release Service Julian Malakar says: Submit a Press Release Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York By Matthew DaviesPosted Jun 19, 2013 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis June 19, 2013 at 5:19 pm How many of these Christian brothers & sisters have we allowed in the USA? I have heard nothing of such refugees being given asylum. Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Video, World Refugee Day Rector Martinsville, VA [Episcopal News Service] Every week in north Paris, a few hundred Iraqi Christians gather for worship. It’s a bittersweet reunion for them. Their lives have been spared, but the events of the past 10 years have forced them into exile. Many have lost close family and friends in the bloodshed of the Iraq War and the resulting rise in terrorism.“There are about a million Iraqi Christians who’ve left Iraq, and 1,300 of them came to France,” said Bishop Pierre Whalon of the Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe. “It’s a drop in the ocean, but it’s 1,300 unique, innocent lives that are sacred to God. How can you say no to that? If you can do something, you should do something.”In 2007, with Iraqi Christians facing increasing persecution as a result of their faith, Whalon and Iraqi businessman Elish Yako set up Association d’Entraide aux Minorités d’Orient (Association to Support Eastern Minorities) to help the French government identify candidates eligible for refuge. The association also has assisted the refugees with their integration and administrative issues.“The Vatican’s official position is that Christians should stay in the Middle East and I totally agree with that; absolutely they should stay there,” said Whalon. “But they can’t stay there if they’re dead.”Many of the refugees are members of the Chaldean Catholic Church, which dates back to the first century, when the region was known as Babylon. They worship partly in Arabic and partly in Aramaic, the language spoken by Jesus.“For them,” Yako said, “the most important thing is their freedom … and to practice their religion without being afraid of terrorists and [of someone] kidnapping their children.”Yako stays in regular contact with every family the association has helped to resettle.One family of four – mother, father, son and daughter – lives about 18 miles south of Paris. They moved to France in 2009 after receiving repeated death threats. The children told Episcopal News Service that, although the first couple of years were difficult because it’s a new life for them, they are happy finally to practice their religion freely and to be proud of it.The son, Samir, 26, spoke about how his dad’s cousin and five of his own friends were killed in terrorist explosions. “You know, we would be sad,” he said. “But we would say, like, ‘Yeah, OK, it’s Iraq,’ you know? ‘It’s Iraq. It’s normal.’”While visiting the family recently, Whalon said: “These people ought still to be in Iraq. You have a young lady here who wants to be a surgeon. Had she been able to stay and study normally, she would be well on her way to being a surgeon. Now she has to recycle herself in France.“A lot of them still own homes. They never wanted to leave them. They lease them out; they expect to return,” Whalon added. “Of course, today the situation is impossible. So of course we want Christians to stay [in Iraq], but we want them to live.”“This family wouldn’t be here, they wouldn’t be on earth, if they hadn’t been rescued.”Unfortunately for Christians still in Iraq, the door of the French immigration services recently closed, Whalon said. As more and more Iraqi Christians face persecution and death in their homeland, there is little hope that France will offer them refuge.“Our political refugee system in America and in France – both systems are completely saturated, and the personnel are overworked, and the system is over-budget. It costs a lot of money to accept people and give them new lives. So I’m really worried,” said Whalon.“The ones that can live to tell the tale, they witness to the power of God. It says a great deal to be about the value of what we do and what we are in the world.”— Matthew Davies is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Washington, DC Tags Submit a Job Listing Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Donald Heacock says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Belleville, IL June 24, 2013 at 4:36 am To answer Donald’s question, the USA has given asylum to many thousands of Iraqis, both Christians, Muslims and Mandaeans. What set the French effort apart was that the people were offered asylum while still in Iraq. Rector Albany, NY Advocacy Peace & Justice, Comments are closed. Rector Shreveport, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET June 19, 2013 at 12:20 pm To stop prosecution against Christianity, international community should acts united to put pressure on respective government and religious head. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector Columbus, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Music Morristown, NJlast_img read more