A goal of ‘telling your own story’

first_imgHarvard President Drew Faust encouraged graduating seniors this afternoon to tell their own stories as they venture into the world, new ones informed by their campus years, their passions, and their embrace of the uncomfortable and the unfamiliar.“Telling your own story, a fresh story, full of possibility and a new order of things, is the task of every generation, and the task before you,” Faust said during the Baccalaureate Service, an annual ritual and a final opportunity for Harvard’s president and clergy to meet informally with the seniors and offer them parting thoughts before Commencement.“Telling a new story isn’t easy,” Faust said. “It can take courage and resolve. It often means leaving the safe path for the unknown.”Dressed in their caps and gowns, seniors crowded into the Memorial Church with cellphones in hand, ready to tell immediate stories with Snapchat photos and videos. One of Harvard’s oldest traditions, dating back to 1642, the Baccalaureate ceremony included songs from the Commencement Choir and readings from Hindu Scriptures, the Hebrew Bible, Confucianism, Taoism, the New Testament, and the Quran.Professor Jonathan Walton and President Drew Faust watch as students enter the Memorial Church. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerIn her address, Faust walked students back through their own Harvard history: four years of adventure, adversity, and academic achievement. They faced fierce weather during their tenure, including a hurricane and historic snowfalls that shut down Harvard more than once. The Boston Marathon bombing drew them together and bonded them to the city “beyond Harvard Square,” she said. There was even an outbreak of the mumps.“For four years,” Faust said, “you have distinguished yourselves with dazzling variety.” Among its many accomplishments, the Class of 2016 produced six Rhodes Scholars, prize-winning senior theses on sea-level change and a water crisis in Michigan, and the play “Black Magic,” written by five African-American Harvard students and mounted at the Loeb Drama Center. The class also produced standout athletes, including six headed to the National Football League, and students eager to help combat malaria, battle global warming, fight for social justice, and change the world.Faust returned to her message from Harvard’s rainy 2012 convocation when she and others urged the then-incoming freshmen to connect, and make Harvard part of their narrative. “Take risks, we told you. Don’t always listen to us.”Danoff Dean of Harvard College Rakesh Khurana (center) speaks to seniors heading into the Memorial Church. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff PhotographerOn another cloudy afternoon just two days before their graduation, she urged them to continue to push past their comfort zones, to look beyond Harvard’s long and successful narrative in order to “locate the discomfort, to act on the restless spirit of that legacy.”Frame your own narrative, Faust told them, something for which their Harvard education has uniquely prepared them. Be “mindful of others,” but never allow others to dictate your story, she said, calling to mind the words of the late Rev. Peter J. Gomes, who was Plummer Professor of Christian Morals and Pusey Minister in the Memorial Church: “Don’t let anyone finish your sentences for you.”“Telling our own stories is not just about us,” Faust said. “It is a conversation with others, exploring larger purposes and other worlds and different ways of thinking. Only by knowing that other stories are possible,” she said, “can we imagine a different future.”In her address, President Drew Faust walked students back through their own Harvard history: four years of adventure, adversity, and academic achievement. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff PhotographerAs with any great story, the historian and author said revision is key to the process. “Keep revising,” Faust urged her listeners, encouraging them to rely on their liberal arts education to rework their story lines beyond Harvard’s gates. “The best education prepares you because it is unsettling, an obstacle course that forces us to question and push and reinvent ourselves, and the world, in a new way.“So congratulations, Class of 2016,” Faust concluded. “Don’t forget from whence you came. Change the narrative. Rewrite the story. There is no one I would rather trust with that task.”Afterward, Allejah Franco, a history and literature concentrator, said Faust’s call for seniors to write their own stories helped him to feel more confident about his future. The Winthrop House resident said he eventually wants to attend law school, but his immediate plans point toward something else entirely.“I want to take a detour,” said Franco. “I am going to go to Japan for at least a year, work as a translator, and just explore that route of life, and write my own story that way.”Baccalaureate Service — May 24, 2016 | Memorial Church Professor Jonathan L. Walton and Harvard President Drew Faust speak during the Baccalaureate Service for the Class of 2016 inside Memorial Church.last_img read more

The value of positive disruptive leadership

first_img 7SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr “Increasing globalization, widespread technological innovation and pressure on business to customize products and services have created an international business environment that would be unrecognizable to the manager of fifteen years ago.”While the above comment could very easily apply to the current corporate world reality, this is in fact a 1995 description of the challenges facing leadership outlined in a government-funded special report titled Enterprising Nation: Renewing Australia’s Managers to Meet the Challenges of the Asia–Pacific Century. This report was a landmark management and leadership development blueprint that became widely known as The Karpin Report.While my international readers might be quick to dismiss this as simply an Australian issue, let’s fast forward 21 years from that 1995 report to the current challenges of global leadership and the question has to be asked… what’s changed?Certainly there is still increasing globalization, there’s still widespread technological innovation and disruption, and there’s still the pressure on business to customize products and services in a competitive local and global economy. continue reading »last_img read more

Cameroon need four points to avoid doom – Broos

first_imgThe “Pharaohs” have six points and the “Black Stars” only one with upstarts Uganda between them on four.Ghana coach Kwesi Appiah called up long-time campaigners like the Ayew brothers, Andre and Jordan, and Asamoah Gyan, and also named five uncapped players.Egypt are away to Uganda Thursday in a repeat of a 2017 Africa Cup of Nations group match in Gabon won 1-0 by the north Africans thanks to a last-gasp Abdallah Said goal.Said is in the squad, and so is 44-year-old goalkeeper Essam El Hadary, as Egypt seek a win after losing the 2017 Nations Cup final to Cameroon and a 2019 qualifier in Tunisia.South Africa accept that hopes of a fourth World Cup appearance could hinge on defeating Cape Verde twice in Group D, starting in Praia Friday.Although an often windy national stadium can help the Cape Verdean “Blue Sharks”, they have lost competitive matches there against Morocco, Libya and Uganda since last year.Burkina Faso, who lead South Africa on goal difference, are away Saturday in Dakar to Senegal, whose formidable attack boasts in-form Liverpool winger Sadio Mane.Gabon will lack 2015 African Footballer of the Year Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang when they host Group C pacesetters the Ivory Coast in Libreville Saturday.Asked why the Borussia Dortmund striker was missing, a Gabonese football official said: “The coach (Spaniard Jose Antonio Camacho) has chosen players who were available.”Ivory Coast have four points, Gabon and Morocco two and Mali one with the Herve Renard-coached Moroccans hosting the Malians in Rabat Friday.Group A appears to be a straight fight between Tunisia and the Democratic Republic of Congo after they defeated Guinea and Libya in previous rounds.The first top-of-the-table meeting is set for Friday in Rades and the Congolese will be handicapped by the absence of injured Everton flier Yannick Bolasie.Share on: WhatsApp Cameroon team at AFCONJohannesburg, South Africa | AFP | Cameroon coach Hugo Broos admits their 2018 World Cup qualifying campaign is doomed if they do not take at least four points off Nigeria in back-to-back clashes.The Group B rivals meet in southeastern Nigerian city Uyo this Friday and in Cameroonian capital Yaounde three days later.Nigeria top the African “group of death” with six points after two rounds, African champions Cameroon have two and Zambia and Algeria one.“If we still want to have a chance of qualifying, we must take at least four points off Nigeria,” the Belgian told reporters.“Should we fail to achieve that target, I do not think it will be possible to qualify for Russia.”Broos is hoping for an away draw and a home victory — results that would reduce the gap between the countries to one point.The remaining two qualifying rounds are scheduled for October and November with only the five group winners in Africa securing places at the global football showcase.“My players need little or no reminding of how important the matches against Cameroon are,” said Germany-born Nigeria coach Gernot Rohr.While Nigeria were fast out of the blocks late last year to defeat Zambia and Algeria, Cameroon did well to draw in Algeria only to be held at home by Zambia.Bottom-of-the-table Algeria dumped midfielder Sofiane Feghouli, a recent Galatasaray signing from West Ham United, for a must-win showdown with Zambia in Lusaka Saturday.Algeria, Cameroon and Nigeria qualified for the 2010 and 2014 World Cup tournaments, but only one of the three countries can make it to Russia.Ayew celebrates at AFCON. Ghana will need similar magic in their must-win game against CongoGhana seek crucial pointsGhana, seeking a fourth consecutive World Cup appearance, host Congo Brazzaville in Kumasi Friday needing maximum points to have any realistic hope of overtaking Group E leaders Egypt.last_img read more

Research brings encouraging news for golf

first_img A new report has brought encouraging news for golf by identifying an increase in the rounds played in Great Britain in the first quarter of 2015. Leading sports research company SPORTS MARKETING SURVEYS INC. (SMS INC.) reports that the average number of rounds played increased by 14%, compared to the same period in 2014.  Richard Payne, Senior Manager of Sports Accounts, commented: “This increase is fantastic news for the industry. This new data offers encouraging insight into the future of the game, and we hope to see similar promising figures leading into the summer months before The Open returns to the home of golf at St Andrews in July.” The above average temperatures and the generally drier weather in January 2015 meant that all regions, except Scotland, enjoyed an encouraging start to the number of rounds played. February was also much drier than the same period 2014, and as a result all regions enjoyed increases in excess of 30%. During this time the Cricket World Cup began with coverage starting in the mornings, however this did not impact on GB golfing figures. March 2015 was relatively cold and wet vis-à-vis 2014, and also a month which saw a dramatic culmination in an exciting Six Nations rugby campaign where the final game attracted a TV audience of around 10 million viewers. Both happenings were key factors in all regions suffering decreases in golf rounds played, with the exception of the North region which boasted an increase (5.7%) in contrast to 2014. Overall, rounds played in the North region of England were up 13.5%, the South region by 15.7% and the Midland region, which includes Wales, by 20.5% 3 Jun 2015 Research brings encouraging news for golf last_img read more