Community Youth Services Among 5 Non-Profits to Receive Washington Women’s Foundation…

first_imgFacebook0Tweet0Pin0 Submitted by Community Youth ServicesWashington Women’s Foundation has announced grant awards to five nonprofit organizations totaling $500,000. Overall Foundation giving since 1996 now totals over $14 million, both through individual grants of $1,000 each and through Pooled Fund Grants of $50,000 – $100,000.“Reaching $14 million in cumulative grants is a testament to the power and leverage of our collective giving model,” said Carla Lewis, President of Washington Women’s Foundation. “Our members have combined their resources, their knowledge and their passion for improving our community to make a significant philanthropic impact across our state.”Pooled Fund Grants were awarded in each of the Foundation’s five giving areas: Arts and Culture, Education, Environment, Health, and Human Services.  Here’s a closer look at the award-winning organizations and the purpose of the grant funds:Shunpike: $100,000 to upgrade technology infrastructure, deliver programs more efficiently, and implement new methods of evaluation in order to provide more effective fiscal management services for artists and arts groups throughout Washington.The Martinez Foundation: $100,000 to expand partnerships with universities in Washington and bring more teachers of color to the state’s most culturally diverse and poverty-impacted school districts.Conservation Northwest: $100,000 to support the Working For Wildlife project, which aims to conserve land, restore habitats, and construct wildlife underpasses for safer migrations across Washington’s Highway 97.Open Arms Perinatal Services: $100,000 to hire more doulas for the Birth Doula Services and Outreach Doula programs, which help low-income new mothers and babies to establish a strong foundation for their future.Community Youth Services: $100,000 to provide food, daytime and overnight refuge, clothing, and referrals at Young Adult Shelter and Rosie’s Place, two shelters serving homeless youth in Thurston County.These awards were presented before a capacity crowd at the Foundation’s annual Grant Awards Celebration, held June 11th at the Northwest African American Museum. There was also a celebratory toast to acknowledge and thank Carla Lewis, President of Washington Women’s Foundation, who will be stepping down from her position in late August. The event was generously sponsored by The Hall Wealth Management Group of Wells Fargo Advisors.Washington Women’s Foundation also presents a WWF Merit Award to the five finalists who were not awarded the Pooled Fund Grants. The Merit Award is in recognition of the Grant Committee’s strong endorsement of these organizations and includes a $2,000 grant in appreciation for the time and effort invested in WWF’s rigorous grant process. The 2014 Merit Awardees are: Seattle Globalist, Wellspring Family Services, Northwest Natural Resource Group, Yoga Behind Bars and Low Income Housing Institute.In addition to combining their giving dollars for the Pooled Fund Grants, Washington Women’s Foundation members will distribute an additional $500,000 this year in Individual Grants to nonprofits of their choice as part of their annual membership contribution. Total Foundation giving for 2014 alone will surpass $1 million.About Washington Women’s Foundation The mission of Washington Women’s Foundation is to educate and expand the number of women engaged in philanthropy, and to build and strengthen community through individual and large impact grants. The Foundation’s members, now more than 500 strong, have invested $14 million of their own resources in nonprofit organizations in the last 19 years. Membership is open to all women interested in philanthropy. For more information, visit www.wawomensfoundation.org.last_img read more

Little Silver Council OKs Liquor Guidelines

first_imgThe ordinance limits the number of barstools to one stool per four dining seats or to one stool for every two feet of bar counter. The maximum capacity of the bar/lounge area will be limited to a maximum of 100 patrons, restricting it to no more than 50 seats, not more than 25 stools and standing capacity of no more than 25.Outdoor dining and serving of drinks and outdoor music would not be permitted, and the location must have food service in its interior during all hours of operation, among the other requirements and stipulations detailed in the ordinances.“This was two years in the making. This wasn’t done lightly,” Galante noted of the ordinances for the small audience on hand for the ordinance public hearing and final vote.Officials explained there are no current plans to build and open a business that would use this license. The borough plan, Neff explained, is to reach out to the state Division of Alcohol Beverage Control (ABC) about conducting some sort of auction or bidding process for potential purchases of the license. By John BurtonLITTLE SILVER – Details governing the borough’s first-ever consumption liquor license were approved at Monday’s Borough Council meeting.The council passed two ordinances, laying out the parameters for the license and constraints for the future establishment.“We’re trying to do this in the best and safest way we can,” said Mayor Robert C. Neff Jr.Under the conditions in the approved ordinance, any future restaurant/bar would have to be established in the borough’s commercially zoned areas and would have to pass muster with the borough Planning Board and local zoning requirements before it can be established, according to Councilman Donald Galante. Any potential buyer would also have to meet all the stringent requirements the ABC has in place, officials added. And the eventual owner would have up to one year to open an establishment for the license’s use. It couldn’t be held as what is commonly called a “pocket license,” an inactive license, Galante explained.In response to an audience question, Galante noted liquor licenses around the state cost anywhere from $350,000 “to even a million (dollars).” But “we’re in uncharted waters here,” given the borough, as far as anyone can remember, has never had an on-premise, commercial consumption liquor license, Neff said.A majority of voters cast ballots last November on a referendum to allow the community to allow its first consumption license. Two previous attempts to pass a voter referendum, in 1976 and then in 1981, were unsuccessful.The idea, according to borough resident Matt Kelly, who spearheaded the initiative, was to allow for a family-style location where residents can gather following local sporting and other borough events.As it currently stands, the borough has two retail licenses, one for the Little Silver Bottle Shop, 497 Prospect Ave., which sells beer and wine as well as spirits; and the Acme supermarket, 507 Prospect Ave., which is permitted to sell only unrefrigerated beer and wine. Diners are allowed to bring their own beer and wine to local restaurants.Under current state regulations, municipalities are allowed to issue new licenses for every 3,000 residents. With its current population at roughly 5,950, Little Silver is allowed only the one consumption license.last_img read more

New Generators To Power Emergency Shelters at Brookdale

first_imgThe generators are being funded through the Sandy Hazard Mitigation Grant Program’s Infrastructure Grant and Energy Allocation Initiative.According to the Monmouth County Sheriff’s Office (MCSO), the project cost for the new generator at Collins Arena is $457,560. The dollar figure for improvements to the Warner Student Life Center is currently being reviewed, though anticipated to be around the same amount.The estimated date of completion for the generator installation is December 2017, said MCSO public information officer Cynthia Scott. With these new generators, county OEM ser vices are anticipating the two buildings at Brookdale will be an integral piece of the Monmouth County Emergency Operations Plan.Scott said Brookdale was chosen as the site because the college “is located outside of any flood zones, the campus is accessible, and the Collins Arena and Student Life Center are capable of holding the largest number of evacuees in one location, thus allowing Monmouth County to maximize its resources.”Monmouth County Sheriff Shaun Golden called Brookdale “an ideal location” for emergency shelters. Other locations are being planned, according to Scott.After Super Storm Sandy slammed the Jersey Shore, Monmouth University was used as the county’s evacuation shelter. Nearly 1,500 people flocked to the university in West Long Branch for relief.The Robert J. Collins Arena is the home court for the Brookdale Jersey Blues, and is also used for high school graduations and other large-scale events. Capacity inside is capped around 2,000 in the 23,000-square-foot event space, according to Brookdale. A four-lane track wraps around the length of the arena, spanning 1/10 of a mile.The Warner Student Life Center, which opened in 2008, is an 81,000-square-foot complex only a few hundred feet away from the arena. It houses the community college’s 335-seat cafeteria, bookstore, numerous large seminar rooms and smaller offices on the bottom floor.Murphy said Brookdale and Monmouth County jointly applied for and received the grant funding for the emergency generators in fiscal year 2015.Throughout Monmouth County, 50 total projects have benefitted from the two Sandy Hazard Mitigation Grants, with $11,457,031 being allocated to energy and infrastructure improvements.On April 13, the Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders unanimously passed a resolution approving a Memorandum of Understanding between the MCSO and Brookdale for the community college to become both an Emergency Evacuation Center and a Community Reception Center.This article was first published in the April 20-27, 2017 print edition of The Two River Times. By Jay Cook | LINCROFT – In the event another major disaster like 2012’s Super Storm Sandy strikes Monmouth County, two buildings on Brookdale Community College’s Lincroft campus will be a refuge for residents.Thanks to federal grants, permanent emergency generators will soon be installed at the Robert J. Collins Arena, and also at the Warner Student Life Center, both on the campus’ southern edge. The college is accessible from Phalanx Road and County Road 520.“In emergency situations, such as we saw after Super Storm Sandy, members of our community often need guidance, support and a safe place to go,” Brookdale president Maureen Murphy said in a statement to The Two River Times. “While we hope we never see a disaster like Sandy again, we are happy to be part of an initiative to provide a safe space for county residents.”last_img read more

Kootenay Ice host Major Midget tryout camp this weekend at NDCC Arena

first_imgMidget-aged hockey players from throughout the Kootenays will be in Nelson this weekend to attend the evaluation camp of the Kootenay Ice Midget AAA Hockey Team.The Ice is part of the 11-team B.C. Major Midget Hockey League for players 15, 16 and 17 year old.Camps are held every year to evaluate players and help coaches select teams. The Kootenay Ice camp, headed up by head coach Mario DiBella and former Nelson Leaf assistant Sean Dooley, is one of 11 held throughout the province.Camp, set for the NDCC Arena in Nelson, begins Friday at 4:30 p.m. with registration followed by a parent meeting.Players, divided into two groups, take to the ice for sessions to close out the first day.Saturday, coaches and evaluators select three teams for scrimmage games.Those teams will be cut to two teams, which play a two-hour game Sunday morning.The tryout camp concludes with player interview Sunday afternoon.The success of the BCMML is at an all time high with the 2011-2012 Evaluation Camps setting a new record for the highest registration in league history.  Approximately 800 players will hit the ice this weekend.The 2011 BCMML champion Vancouver North West Giants defeated Alberta rep Red Deer Rebels to advance to the National Midget Championship TELUS Cup for the first time in league history.In 2010-11 the Kootenay Ice finished 10th overall with an 8-25-7 record. Some of last year’s team, including Dryden Hunt of Nelson and Luke Bertolucci of Trail used seasoning in the BCMMHL to garner potential spots on Tier II Junior A rosters in the B.C. Hockey [email protected]last_img read more