DDTV: Donegal Rose wows audience with stunning performance

first_imgOur Donegal rose Zoe McGettigan sang the classic ballad, “Travelling Solider”, last night at the Rose of Tralee International Festival in Kerry.We doubt a dry eye was left in the house after this amazing performance. Well done Zoe, you’re doing Donegal very proud!DDTV: Donegal Rose wows audience with stunning performance was last modified: August 19th, 2016 by Elaine McCalligShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:letterkennyRose of Traleesingertravelling soldierzoe mc gettiganlast_img read more

Research model suggests moons of some planets developed from rings

first_imgThis is an image of the planet Uranus taken by the spacecraft Voyager 2 in 1986. Image: NASA (Phys.org)—French researchers Sébastien Charnoz and Aurélien Crida have proposed in a paper published in the journal Science that moons that orbit some of the planets in our solar system came about due to accretion from material in rings that used to surround the planets, rather than as entities that took shape while their host planets were forming. Citation: Research model suggests moons of some planets developed from rings (2012, November 30) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-11-moons-planets.html Explore further ‘Hot Jupiter’ planets unlikely to have moons More information: Formation of Regular Satellites from Ancient Massive Rings in the Solar System, Science, 30 November 2012: Vol. 338 no. 6111 pp. 1196-1199 DOI: 10.1126/science.1226477ABSTRACTWhen a planetary tidal disk—like Saturn’s rings—spreads beyond the Roche radius (inside which planetary tides prevent aggregation), satellites form and migrate away. Here, we show that most regular satellites in the solar system probably formed in this way. According to our analytical model, when the spreading is slow, a retinue of satellites appear with masses increasing with distance to the Roche radius, in excellent agreement with Saturn’s, Uranus’, and Neptune’s satellite systems. This suggests that Uranus and Neptune used to have massive rings that disappeared to give birth to most of their regular satellites. When the spreading is fast, only one large satellite forms, as was the case for Pluto and Earth. This conceptually bridges the gap between terrestrial and giant planet systems.center_img Space researchers have long proposed that moons circulating planets generally came to exist in one of three ways: as entities that formed on their own as their host was developing, as clumps that coalesced from material shed from a planet struck by some other body, or by being captured as they passed by. In this new research, Charnoz and Crida propose a fourth possibility – that the moons were formed from material in rings that surrounded their host planet.In attempting to explain how moons orbiting planets such as Uranus, Neptune and Pluto, came about, the researchers created mathematical models that could predict moon formation from material surrounding a planet. Their models suggest that when material in a ring reaches a certain critical point at some distance from the host, called the Roche radius, the gravity from the host planet is offset by the gravitational pull that each piece exerts on others in the ring. Because of this, material in the ring begins to coalesce with some pieces eventually accreting enough material to form a moon. They add that the speed at which material in the ring orbits the host may account for the number of moons that form. Slow moving material might result in the formation of several small moons, while fast moving material may result in just one, as might have been the case with Earth and its single moon. Their model explains, they suggest, why all of the moons orbiting planets (except for Jupiter) in our solar system grow in size as they orbit farther from the host planet. Jupiter they say, is an exception, with its moons likely originating in tandem with the planet birth itself.The researchers concede that their models can’t explain how the rings themselves came to exist, but suggest it’s possible that they came about due to collisions with other bodies moving through space. © 2012 Phys.org Journal information: Science This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Researchers make complex molecule that spontaneously folds like a protein

first_img Researchers discover the initial stages of the folding mechanism of membrane proteins © 2019 Science X Network Journal information: Journal of the American Chemical Society Explore further To induce spontaneous folding, the researchers added saltwater. They note that their molecule needed a nucleobase to form the macrocycle, but others, such as guanine or adenine, would work equally well. They next plan to work with the molecule they created to learn how to modify its self-assembly properties to create designer macrocycles in the future. They also note that their process demonstrates that folding molecules might have played a role in the beginning of life on Earth at an earlier stage than has been thought. Core part of the foldamer, showing five stacks of three phenyl rings connected by disulfide bonds. Credit: Bin Liu, University of Groningen Top view of the central cavity of the folded molecule. Credit: Bin Liu, University of Groningencenter_img In nature, there are a number of proteins that fold spontaneously to carry out various functions. But misfolding can lead to problems, such as the development of neurological diseases. Scientists have been interested in such folding not only because it might help in understanding human ailments, but because it might be relevant to understanding how life began on Earth. In this new effort, the researchers sought to replicate the folding seen in nature by building their own spontaneously folding molecules.The researchers report that they achieved their goal—they found a way to create a self-assembling, self-folding molecule called a macrocycle. More specifically, a 15mer macrocycle made up of 75 atoms. To achieve the folding, the molecule was formed in the shape of a ring. The researchers note that the end result (called a foldamer) had a hydrophilic surface and a hydrophobic core, which they note mirrors the structure of naturally occurring folding proteins. They further note that the foldamer was held together by hydrogen bonds, the interaction between ring stacking and a disulfide bridge. The molecule also had a third tiled structure made of stacks of rings. More information: Bin Liu et al. Complex Molecules that Fold like Proteins Can Emerge Spontaneously, Journal of the American Chemical Society (2018). DOI: 10.1021/jacs.8b11698Press release Citation: Researchers make complex molecule that spontaneously folds like a protein (2019, January 11) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-01-complex-molecule-spontaneously-protein.html In biology, folded proteins are responsible for most advanced functions. These complex proteins are the result of evolution or design by scientists. Now, a team of scientists led by University of Groningen Professor of Systems Chemistry, Sijbren Otto, have discovered a new class of complex folding molecules that emerge spontaneously from simple building blocks. The results were published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society on 16 January.A team of researchers from the Netherlands, Italy and Poland has developed a way to make complex molecules that spontaneously fold like proteins. In their paper published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, the group describes their approach to manipulating molecules in useful ways, what they discovered, and the ways they believe their results might be used. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more