Lloyds Bank Foundation announces £2.5m funding to improve criminal justice system

first_img  650 total views,  2 views today Lloyds Bank Foundation announces £2.5m funding to improve criminal justice system Tagged with: Funding  651 total views,  3 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis3 Lloyds Bank Foundation for England and Wales is investing £2.5m in charities seeking to improve the criminal justice system.The Foundation has awarded £2,503,293 in new funding for up to three years to 17 specialist charities and partnerships to help them make a positive impact on policy and practice in the criminal justice system. The new funding is in addition to investments of £5,895,139 made to criminal justice charities since 2015 to help support their frontline services.The Foundation’s programme is supporting the voluntary sector to gather evidence, speak up and use their expertise and understanding to help influence policy and practice across probation, prisons and the wider criminal justice system. Charities funded through the programme will aim to affect change at a local, regional, or national level within five years and are seeking to:Make the case for better alternatives to prison, by intervening earlier to prevent crime and reduce the number of people going to prison;Improve how groups disproportionately affected by the criminal justice system are treated, such as BAME prisoners, young people and women;Improve how the prison and probation service work, in particular by ensuring that specialist and small charities are properly involved and funded.Those being funded include Maslaha, which will be using a £262,440 grant to challenge unfair and discriminatory treatment received by Muslims in the prison system. Other charities being funded to better protect and support marginalised groups experiencing disproportional outcomes in the current system include Women in Prison, Brighton Women’s Centre, Agenda, The Standing Committee for Youth Justice, The Care Leavers Association, The Traveller Movement, Ipswich and Suffolk Council for Racial Equality (ISCRE) and Zahid Mubarek Trust.Also being funded are charities Centre for Justice Innovation and CASSPLUS, which have been awarded £191,770 to jointly push for more effective early intervention services in the justice system.Centre for Justice Innovation’s Head of Evidence and Data Stephen Whitehead said:“The criminal justice system is missing opportunities to address the root causes of crime before they spiral out of control. Nine out of 10 prisoners have been convicted at least once before being imprisoned and half have been convicted at least 15 times. By finding new ways to intervene as early as the first time that a person is convicted – or even the first time they are arrested – we can address the issues driving their offending before they escalate.” Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis3 Melanie May | 28 January 2020 | News The charities APPEAL, Centre for Crime and Justice Studies, Criminal Justice Alliance, Revolving Doors and Transform Justice are also being funded to highlight problems in the criminal justice system and make the case for better alternatives to prison through championing effective early intervention, prevention and rehabilitation.Also being funded, to support specialist small charities to become stronger, speak up and improve the policy and operating environment, are Clinks, Community Chaplaincy Association, M.A.L.S. Merseyside and Thames Valley Partnership. Lloyds Bank Foundation Chief Executive Paul Streets said:“The criminal justice system is facing huge challenge. Small specialist charities have had huge success in tackling reoffending, helping people turn lives around and preventing people from falling into a cycle of crime. Yet, despite their expertise and track record, charities are still not properly involved in how prisons and the probation service are funded and organised. At the start of this new Government and Parliament there is a clear need and chance to make changes to reform and improve the system.” About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.last_img read more

Thousands to attend Road Safety Roadshows

first_img WhatsApp Previous articleFermanagh IRA victims meet Taoiseach to discuss lax securityNext articleNI plastic bag charge will lead to 10 new jobs in Derry News Highland Pinterest Thousands to attend Road Safety Roadshows Twitter Google+ PSNI and Gardai urged to investigate Adams’ claims he sheltered on-the-run suspect in Donegal In excess of 3,000 secondary school pupils from across Donegal will attend the annual, award winning Road Safe Road Show in the Aura Leisure Centre in Letterkenny today and tomorrow.Donegal County Council in association with the Donegal Road Safety Working Group host the hard hitting shows.They show in graphic detail the consequences of a road traffic collisions through presentations from the emergency services, people who have lost loved ones and those involved in crashes themselves.Donegal Road Safety Officer Eamon Browne says the shows are very effective:[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/eamampm.mp3[/podcast] Google+ Dail to vote later on extending emergency Covid powers WhatsApp Man arrested in Derry on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences released center_img HSE warns of ‘widespread cancellations’ of appointments next week Pinterest Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR By News Highland – October 16, 2012 Facebook Twitter Dail hears questions over design, funding and operation of Mica redress scheme News Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derrylast_img read more