Charity karting

first_imgRank Hovis will be sponsoring this year’s Kart Grand Prix, an annual charity event that raises money for the Bakers’ Benevolent Fund, which raised over £2,250 last year.People in the industry can either register drivers or sponsor a prize. Both experienced karters and complete novices can attend. This year’s event is to be held at Daytona Raceway, Milton Keynes Thursday 27 September, 10.30am-4.00pm.Email [email protected] or tel 01494 428505.last_img

Obesity trends will snuff out health gains from decline in smoking

first_imgIf obesity trends continue, the negative effect on the health of the U.S. population will overtake the benefits gained from declining smoking rates, according to a study by Harvard and University of Michigan researchers published today in the New England Journal of Medicine.“In the past 15 years, smoking rates have declined by 20 percent, but obesity rates have increased by 48 percent,” says lead author Susan T. Stewart, Ph.D, a Harvard research associate for the joint project of the National Bureau of Economic Research and Harvard’s Interfaculty Program for Health System Improvement. “If past trends continue, nearly half of the population – 45 percent – is projected to be obese by 2020.”Using a technical analysis that includes forecasting future trends based on historical data, researchers found that despite declines in smoking, the remaining life expectancy of a typical 18-year-old would be held back by 0.71 years by the year 2020 because of the increased body-mass index of the general population. The researchers also looked at quality of life. That same 18-year-old could expect to give up 0.91 years of increased quality-adjusted life expectancy.If all U.S. adults became nonsmokers of normal weight by 2020, their life expectancy would be forecast to increase by 3.76 years or 5.16 quality-adjusted years.“Obesity plays a large role in life expectancy,” said co-author Allison B. Rosen, assistant professor in the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Michigan. “Despite the fact that we are smoking less, body-mass indexes (BMI) are going up. These increases in obesity are overtaking these changes in smoking behaviors.”However, the researchers say the study’s results don’t imply that life expectancy will fall – more likely, life expectancy will continue to rise due to other factors, but less rapidly than it otherwise would.In addition to better managing clinical risk factors such as blood sugar among those who are obese, effective public health efforts are needed to address the roots of obesity, like sedentary lifestyles, the widespread availability of high-calorie food in large portions and reduced time for the preparation of food at home, says David Cutler, Ph.D., another co-author of this study and Otto Eckstein Professor of Applied Economics in the department of economics and Kennedy School of GovernmentRosen said this study does not indicate that people are getting heavier because they are not smoking. The weight gain associated with quitting smoking is temporary and thus not significant enough to drive the rising trend in increased BMIs.Public health efforts to discourage smoking have worked, and a similar effort could help turn around obesity rates, Rosen said. Many weight control interventions have proven successful and their use should be encouraged.“Losing weight is harder than quitting smoking. People don’t have to smoke to live. People have to eat to live,” she said.“The hypothetical scenario of having everyone a non-smoker of normal weight may be unachievable. But these results show the dramatic toll that both smoking and obesity can have on both the length of life and the quality of life.”The study was funded by the National Institute on Aging, the Harvard Interfaculty Program for Health Systems Improvement and the Lasker Foundation.last_img read more

Deep receiver class faces high hopes for immediate impact

first_img Associated Press Top-end receivers this year include Colorado’s Laviska Shenault, Alabama’s Jerry Jeudy and Henry Ruggs III, Oklahoma’s CeeDee Lamb, LSU’s Justin Jefferson, Arizona State’s Brandon Aiyuk and Clemson’s Tee Higgins.“This receivers’ class is honestly unbelievable in my eyes,” Lamb said. “You can’t really go wrong with anybody you draft” in any round. “You’re going to get a great pick.”Whether in search of a crisp route-runner, a deep threat, a fearless player going over the middle or even taking the direct snap, there’s someone for everyone in this year’s draft.“I think this class is going to do great things,” Shenault said.Right from the start, no less. Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditThe upcoming NFL draft features a tantalizing class of wide receivers expected to make an immediate impact as rookies.It’s a tall task even for an exceptionally deep group that’s expected to produce up to a half dozen first-round picks Thursday night. Receivers face one of the hardest adjustments to the pros because they have to absorb a monster playbook, beat press coverage and elude D-backs who are quicker, stronger and savvier. Sometimes the gamble pays off; sometimes it doesn’t.“One of the things that makes it tough to evaluate is that there’s so much difference playing at the National Football League level because of all the defenses we see and all the adjustments they have to make,” said long-time talent evaluation expert Gil Brandt, a Pro Football Hall of Famer.Quarterback is the only position with a steeper learning curve, Brandt suggested.“These guys have to do a lot more things in the NFL as far as adjustments — and do it quickly,” he said. “And the other thing is separation. There’s a lot of guys that can run fast but they can’t separate.”Mark Dominik, a SiriusXM NFL Radio host and former Buccaneers general manager, said receivers go from facing “18-, 19- and 20-year-old young men who aren’t as strong or as physical as they’re going to end up being” to “going up against a 29-year-old man and it’s a huge difference. Intersecting this meet-you-halfway approach is an uptick in the athleticism of wide receivers, a product of the multiple-receiver sets now the norm all the way down to youth football.“I think in today’s day and age where these guys were starting 7-on-7, it’s almost like AAU basketball,” Packers GM Brian Gutekunst said. “The receivers are so much more advanced in terms of their fundamentals coming into college and the league than maybe they have been in the past. It’s really just the NFL offense that will take time. “So I think there’s some guys sitting here today that I think will have a chance to make a pretty immediate impact, and I’m excited about that.”Washington Redskins coach Ron Rivera said today’s prospects are primed for the pro game as never before. “I think that’s why you see receivers bust, just because of the different player they’re going against.”That is starting to change, however.Teams are more willing than ever to bypass the old wait-and-watch standby for a plug-and-play approach with bigger, faster, quicker pass-catchers coming out. Calvin Ridley and D.J. Moore made big splashes in 2018, followed by Deebo Samuel, DK Metcalf, Marquise Brown, Terry McLaurin and A.J. Brown, who wasted no time establishing their credentials last season.“Last year was a good year in terms of a bunch of rookies coming in and having a lot of success, but if you look over the last several years, that second- and third-round receiver group has arguably been better than the first-round group,” said NFL draft analyst Daniel Jeremiah.center_img “The challenge in scouting the position is it’s almost like two different games for college and the NFL in terms of what routes you’re asked to run, which are very limited at the college level,” Jeremiah said. “You watch a college game on Saturday you’re going to see a bunch of slants, hitches and go’s. It’s very limited in terms of what they ask them to do, very limited in terms of them having to read coverage and sight-adjust their routes. They don’t see very much press coverage.”Reading and reacting to coverage and keeping defenders from knocking them off their routes can prove difficult even for receivers who dominated college competition.“There’s just a lot of adjustment there, but I give the NFL credit,” Jeremiah said. “I think the last couple of years we’re seeing the NFL be a little smarter with the transition period for these guys and figuring out ways they can get them on fly sweeps or bubble screens and just get the ball in their hands and let them make plays, simplifying it a little bit while they’re young before they can grow and evolve into everything you want them to be.”Jeremiah said last season in particular provided “the blueprint to get these guys on the field and improve that track record at the position.” April 19, 2020 Deep receiver class faces high hopes for immediate impact ___Follow Arnie Melendrez Stapleton on Twitter: http://twitter.com/arniestapleton___More AP NFL: https://apnews.com/NFL and https://twitter.com/AP_NFL,Tampa Bay Lightning advance to face Dallas Stars in Stanley Cup finals, beating New York Islanders 2-1 in OT in Game 6last_img read more

Djokovic tests positive for COVID-19, Adria Tour cancelled

first_img****XINHUA Share on: WhatsApp FILE PHOTO: Novak DjokovicKampala, Uganda | XINHUA | Novak Djokovic and his wife Jelena tested positive for COVID-19 on Tuesday in Belgrade, confirmed the press office of the world’s No. 1 tennis player in a release.Djokovic was tested immediately upon his arrival in Belgrade from Zadar, Croatia, where the second leg of the Adria Tour regional tennis tournament was interrupted and canceled by confirmed cases of infections among participants and their teams.“The moment we arrived in Belgrade we went to be tested. My result is positive, just as Jelena’s, while the results of our children are negative,” Djokovic stated.He explained that the purpose of the Adria Tour that he organized with his family was “to unite and share a message of solidarity and compassion throughout the region”, as well as to help both established and emerging tennis players from South-Eastern Europe to gain access to some competitive tennis while the various tours are on hold due to the COVID-19 situation.center_img “Unfortunately, this virus is still present, and it is a new reality that we are still learning to cope and live with. I am hoping things will ease with time so we can all resume lives the way they were. I am extremely sorry for each individual case of infection. I hope that it will not complicate anyone’s health situation and that everyone will be fine. I will remain in self-isolation for the next 14 days, and repeat the test in five days,” Djokovic stated in the press release.Previously, legs of Adria Tour have been canceled in Montenegro and Slovenia due to health concerns, while during the tournament in Zadar several players and team members tested positive on COVID-19 including Grigor Dimitrov and Borna Coric.Organizers of the Adria Tour stated Tuesday that the scheduled tournaments in Banjaluka and Sarajevo are cancelled too because “it is of highest importance to stabilize the epidemiologic situation.”last_img read more

Thurston EDC Introduces New Board Of Director Executive Members

first_imgFacebook0Tweet0Pin0 Submitted by Thurston Economic Development CouncilThurston Economic Development Council (EDC) is pleased to introduce Jace Munson as President, and Reid Bates, Vice President, of the Thurston EDC Board of Directors. Both commenced their position at the beginning of this year, for a 2-year term that runs through the end of 2014.“The EDC has a long history of strong Board leadership.  Both Jace and Reid possess a strong working knowledge of the Thurston County’s economy.  Jace has long been recognized as one of the region’s premier leaders in his economic sector, and brings a solid background in business and community development.  I am looking forward to working with Jace as our president – and I am confident that the EDC, with his leadership, will continue to see success in our efforts to recruit employment, retain our local business, and expand market opportunities,” says Michael Cade, Executive Director of the EDC.Jace Munson is the Principal and CEO of Berschauer Phillips Construction Company, a family-owned general contracting firm in Tumwater, WA. He has been with Berschauer Phillips for 18 years, and has extensive experience in general contracting and construction management services for private sector, governmental and public works clients. Mr. Munson has been a member of the Thurston EDC board since 2004.Reid Bates is the Managing Partner of Express Employment Professionals of Olympia, a recruiting and staffing firm in the South Puget Sound area. He has been with Express Employment for 6 years, and has extensive corporate management experience. He has been on the Thurston EDC board of Directors since 2010.We welcome both Mr. Munson and Mr. Bates to their respective roles, and look forward to their guidance as we continue our economic and community development work in Thurston County.last_img read more