Foreclosures Rise in Q3 Despite Falling to Eight-Year Low in September

first_imgHome / Daily Dose / Foreclosures Rise in Q3 Despite Falling to Eight-Year Low in September The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Foreclosures Rise in Q3 Despite Falling to Eight-Year Low in September  Print This Post Share Save Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Related Articles Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Subscribe in Daily Dose, Featured, Foreclosure, News Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Default Notices Foreclosures quarterly report RealtyTrac REO 2014-10-15 Brian Honea Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days agocenter_img The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Tagged with: Default Notices Foreclosures quarterly report RealtyTrac REO Brian Honea’s writing and editing career spans nearly two decades across many forms of media. He served as sports editor for two suburban newspaper chains in the DFW area and has freelanced for such publications as the Yahoo! Contributor Network, Dallas Home Improvement magazine, and the Dallas Morning News. He has written four non-fiction sports books, the latest of which, The Life of Coach Chuck Curtis, was published by the TCU Press in December 2014. A lifelong Texan, Brian received his master’s degree from Amberton University in Garland. Previous: DS News Webcast: Thursday 10/16/2014 Next: ACES Risk Management, Kroll Factual Data Announce Partnership October 15, 2014 923 Views Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Foreclosure filings, which include default notices, scheduled auctions, and bank repossessions, inched upward nationwide in Q3 despite dropping to their lowest level in eight years in September, according to RealtyTrac’s Q3 2014 U.S. Foreclosure Market Report released on Thursday.A total of 317,171 residential properties in the U.S. reported foreclosure filings in Q3, which is a decline of 16 percent from the same quarter in 2013 but an increase of 0.42 percent from Q2, according to RealtyTrac. It was the first quarter-over-quarter increase reported since the third quarter of 2011.RealtyTrac cited a 2 percent increase in default notices and a 7 percent jump in scheduled foreclosure auctions as the reasons for the quarterly increase in foreclosure filings. The number of bank repossessions (REOs) declined by 12 percent from Q2 to Q3.The number of foreclosure filings in September (106,866) was down 9 percent from August and down 19 percent from September 2013. September was the 48th consecutive month in which foreclosure filings declined on a year-over-year basis. With the recent decline, foreclosure filings nationwide are at their lowest level since July 2006, a total of 98 months.”September foreclosure activity was back to pre-housing bubble levels nationwide, in large part thanks to a continued slide in bank repossessions,” said Daren Blomquist, vice president at RealtyTrac. “However, a recent rise in scheduled foreclosure auctions in many markets across the country shows lenders are continuing to clean house of lingering delinquent loans. This rise in scheduled auctions foreshadows a corresponding rise in bank repossessions and auction sales to third party buyers in the coming months.”The five states with the highest foreclosure rate were Florida, Maryland, New Jersey, Nevada, and Illinois, according to RealtyTrac. The five metropolitan statistical areas with the highest foreclosure rates were Orlando, Florida; Atlantic City, New Jersey; Macon, Georgia; Ocala, Florida; and Palm Bay-Melbourne-Titusville, Florida.Meanwhile, RealtyTrac reported that the foreclosure process is taking longer nationwide. In Q3 of 2014, properties were in the foreclosure process for an average of 615 days, an increase of 7 percent from Q2 and 13 percent from Q3 2013. It is the longest average time for the foreclosure process since RealtyTrac began tracking the data in 2007. New Jersey had the longest average foreclosure time of any state at 1,064 days, according to RealtyTrac.The number of default notices nationwide in Q3 increased by 2 percent from the previous quarter but declined by 11 percent from the same quarter a year ago, according to RealtyTrac. It was the ninth straight quarter in which default notices declined year-over-year nationwide. Ten states saw a year-over-year increase in default notices in Q3, led by Indiana (up 59 percent), Oklahoma (up 49 percent), Massachusetts (up 38 percent), New Jersey (up 19 percent), and Iowa (up 12 percent).Scheduled foreclosure auctions in the U.S. totaled 139,721 for Q3, up 7 percent from Q2 but down by 1 percent from Q3 2013, marking the 15th straight quarter in which foreclosure auctions declined year-over-year. The number of scheduled foreclosure auctions rose on a year-over-year basis in 22 states, led by North Carolina and Oregon with an 85 percent increase each, New Jersey (66 percent), Oklahoma (58 percent), and New York (57 percent). Scheduled foreclosure auctions increased in 32 states quarter-over-quarter, led by Michigan with a 34 percent hike, followed by Maryland (up 30 percent) and California, Texas, and Arizona with a 25 percent increase each.REO activity is down nationwide; in the third quarter, lenders repossessed 74,271 residential properties in the U.S. in Q3, representing a decline of 12 percent from Q2 and a drop of 38 percent from Q3 2013. It was the 16th consecutive quarter in which REO activity declined year-over-year. Still, REO activity increased in Q3 from the same period a year ago in seven states, led by Maine (up 24 percent), Maryland (up 19 percent), Oregon (up 13 percent), Georgia (up 11 percent) and New Jersey (up 5 percent). 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Club to sponsor blood drive in Hurley Hall

first_imgImagine your community is desperately lacking a resource that your own body produces every day. The solution, senior Shannon Kraemer said, is obvious: give blood.Notre Dame Relay for Life and the American Cancer Society (ACS) student club are sponsoring a blood drive Tuesday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hurley Hall. For each unit of blood donated to the South Bend Medical Foundation, a $5 donation will be given to Relay for Life.Kraemer, co-chair for Relay for Life and co-president of the American Cancer Society club, said that even one donation can make a significant difference.“One donation of blood can save more than three lives or seven babies’ lives,” Kraemer said.The number of blood donors is decreasing every year, she said, and many young adults do not donate blood.“I think it is something with our generation that primarily we are pretty busy or we travel and we just forget to give,” she said.She said one of her professors suggested the decrease in blood donations could be because of a generational difference.“My professor said that when he was younger everyone gave and it was kind of a moral requirement that you give blood,” Kraemer said. “There is a bizarre mentality that ‘Hey it’s my blood, I can choose what to do with it,’ and I want to be sympathetic to that perspective, but I think we are all kind of in this together, and if it’s your grandma, or your mom, you wouldn’t think twice.”Kraemer said there is a red banner on the South Bend Medical Foundation’s website, givebloodnow.com, which states that there is less than a two-day supply of A-negative and O-positive blood.“I got really kind of anxious about it,” Kraemer said. “This I feel like is organic, you make your own blood and you’ll always have more of it, so why can’t we be a little generous to our surrounding community when that’s what means most?”Participating in the blood drive is especially convenient for students since it takes place at central location on campus, Kraemer said. Last year only about half the appointment slots were filled, and she said she hopes a bigger turnout will occur this year.“I think as a University that has social justice standards and human rights conversations … I really think we should be able to fill up more than two people an hour for this event,” Kraemer said.Kraemer said many students travel internationally and as a result cannot give blood. She said for the past couple of years she was one of those students and that she looks forward to giving blood again tomorrow. She said students who are able to give blood should be donating to compensate for those who cannot, especially since there is such a dire need for donations in the South Bend community.“I just wanted to communicate that this is urgent and students need to wake up to this,” Kraemer said.Tags: American Cancer Society, blood drive, Relay for Lifelast_img read more

BOXING:FBI suspected Ali’s legendary 1964 victory over Liston was FIXED, documents reveal

first_imgFBI suspected Ali’s legendary 1964 victory over Liston was FIXED, documents revealFifty years on from the man then known as Cassius Clay beating Sonny Liston to become heavyweight champion of the world for the first time, new documents have come to light which reveal that the FBI long suspected that the shock result was really a fix. The fight between reigning champion Liston and brash young upstart Clay – later renamed Muhammad Ali – took place on February 25, 1964, in Miami Clay, just 22, entered the ring as a 7-1 underdog, but pulled off a shock victory which laid the foundations for his glittering career to follow.The memorable match, named the fourth-greatest sports moment of the 20th century by Sports Illustrated, ended when Liston quit after the seventh round and Clay started jumping and waving his hands, yelling ‘I’m the champ!’Now documents released to The Washington Times under the Freedom of Information Act reveal that the FBI suspected the fight may have been fixed by a Las Vegas figure tied to organized crime and to Liston. The memos, so sensitive that they were addressed directly to Director J. Edgar Hoover, show the FBI suspected Ash Resnick, a Las Vegas gambler with organized crime connections, of fixing multiple boxing matches, including the first Clay-Liston fight.The key new evidence is an FBI memo dated May 24, 1966, that details an interview with a Houston gambler named Barnett Magids, who described to agents his discussions with Resnick before the first Clay-Liston fight.Magids told them that Resnick strongly advised him against betting on Liston winning. The reports also reveal that Resnick and Liston both reportedly made over $1million betting against Liston in the fight.The documents show no evidence that Ali was in on the scheme or even knew about it, while nothing suggests the bureau ever fully corroborated the suspicions it investigated. Both fighters were controversial figures, Liston was an ex-con with ties to the mob ties, while Clay had joined the Black Muslims weeks before the fight and changed his name to Ali shortly afterwards.  Early in the fight Clay was in trouble early, losing his vision at one point, before he came back to convincingly beat Liston.The result was such a shock at the time that there was speculation that the outcome might have been manipulated.Liston said he quit because of a shoulder injury, while the Miami Beach Boxing Commission doctor reportedly diagnosed a torn tendon in Liston’s left shoulder. Florida State Attorney Richard Gerstein conducted a post-fight investigation, which concluded that Liston went into the fight with a bad shoulder. He determined there was no evidence that the fight was not ‘completely regular,’ according to The Palm Beach Post. Miami Beach Boxing Commission Chairman Morris Klein said commissioners were satisfied that there was ‘no wrongdoing’ and allowed Liston to collect his $370,000 purse. A US Senate subcommittee conducted hearings three months later but found no evidence of a fixed fight.Celebration: When Liston quit after the seventh round Clay started jumping and waving his hands, yelling ‘I’m the champ’last_img read more