HLS Professor Roger Fisher dies

first_imgRoger D. Fisher ’43, LL.B. ’ 48, co-author of the perennial best-selling book “Getting to Yes” and the Williston Professor of Law Emeritus at Harvard University, died Aug. 25 in Hanover, N.H. He was 90 years old.Fisher was a pioneer in the field of international law and negotiation and the co-founder of the Harvard Negotiation Project. A professor at Harvard Law School for more than four decades, Fisher established negotiation and conflict resolution as a single field deserving academic study and devoted his career to challenging students and colleagues alike to explore alternative methods of dispute resolution.Harvard Law School Dean Martha Minow said: “Harvard Law School has been profoundly privileged to count Roger Fisher as a treasured colleague, teacher, and leader; the countless problems he solved, lives he changed, and negotiations he led or inspired are an awe-inspiring legacy.”Through analysis and writing, Fisher’s work laid the foundation on which much of the field of negotiation and conflict resolution has been based. His best-selling book, “Getting to Yes: Negotiating Without Giving In” (co-authored with William Ury in 1981), has been translated into 23 languages and has sold more than 3 million copies worldwide. Prior to the publication of “Getting to Yes,” there were almost no regular courses in negotiation taught at academic institutions. Now there are hundreds, if not thousands, of courses devoted to negotiation.“Through his writings and teaching, Roger Fisher’s seminal contributions literally changed the way millions of people around the world approach negotiation and dispute resolution,” said HLS Professor Robert Mnookin ’68, chair of the Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School and director of the Harvard Negotiation Research Project (HNP). “He taught that conflict is not simply a ‘zero-sum’ game in which a fixed pie is simply divided through haggling or threats. Instead, he showed how by exploring underlying interests and being imaginative, parties could often expand the pie and create value.”In 1979, Fisher co-founded the Harvard Negotiation Project with Ury and Bruce Patton ’84, serving as the director. HNP’s mission is “to improve the theory and practice of conflict resolution and negotiation by working on real-world conflict intervention, theory building, education and training, and writing and disseminating new ideas.”Patton, who co-wrote the 1991 edition of “Getting to Yes” and is a Distinguished Fellow of the Harvard Negotiation Project, said Fisher’s legacy was much broader than his work on negotiation. “Roger sought to build a systematic toolbox for analyzing and diagnosing the causes of any disliked situation and finding practical, effective ways to move it toward a preferred state. Like a hard scientist, Roger believed that one could not build such tools (or teach them effectively) without being able to test and refine them in the crucible of practice.”According to Patton, Fisher’s efforts contributed directly and materially to multiple steps toward peace in the Middle East, including Sadat’s trip to Jerusalem, and the Camp David summit that led to an Israeli-Egyptian peace treaty; peace in Central America and especially in El Salvador; the resolution of the longest-running war in the Western Hemisphere between Ecuador and Peru; the breakthrough that enabled resolution of the Iranian hostage conflict in 1980; a fundamental reshaping of the U.S.-Soviet relationship; and the negotiations and constitutional process that led to the end of apartheid in South Africa. (Read the full text of Pattons’ tribute here.) Fisher is also recognized as the intellectual father of the “West Point Negotiation Project,” which has trained Army officers and cadets to recognize conflicts and apply the tools of principled negotiation in both peace and war.Ury, a mediator for more than 30 years, said Fisher had a tremendous influence on students and colleagues. Ury said his own future was shaped by a seminal phone call from Fisher in 1977. As a graduate student in social anthropology, Ury received a call from Fisher praising Ury on his research paper, which proposed an anthropological study of the Middle East peace negotiations. Fisher told Ury that he liked his paper so much he sent it to the assistant secretary of state for the Middle East, and wanted Ury to work with him.“I was stunned. Never had I expected a professor to call me up, let alone invite me to collaborate, or see one of my ideas offered up for practical application,” said Ury. “Roger introduced me to the field of negotiation, taught and mentored me, and shaped my career more than anyone. It would be impossible for me to imagine my work without the inspiration and influence of Roger Fisher.“Robert C. Bordone ’97, the Thaddeus R. Beal Clinical Professor of Law and the director of the Harvard Negotiation and Mediation Clinical Program, said: “Roger was a master at the art of perspective-taking, of understanding how deep human needs — to be heard, valued, respected, autonomous, and safe — when unmet or trampled upon, become seeds of evil and violence, seeds that can cause us to vilify each other, and that motivate us to see the world in stark black-and-white terms. For Roger, the purpose of perspective-taking was never to excuse or justify evil. Rather, it was a way to discover new approaches to diplomacy, to influence and to understanding.”During World War II, Fisher served in the U.S. Army Air Force in the North Atlantic and Pacific theaters as a weather reconnaissance observer. After discovering that his college roommate and two of his best friends were killed in the war, he dedicated most of his life to finding a better way to deal with the kind of differences that produce war.Fifty years after his graduation from Harvard College in 1943, Fisher wrote for his Class Report: “Since our freshman year, beginning in the fall of 1939 with World War II, the primary focus of my interest has been how the world copes with its conflicting values, perceptions, wants, and needs. After losing my roommate and some of my best friends in war, I knew we had to find a better way for people to deal with their differences.”After graduating from Harvard Law School in 1948, Fisher passed up a clerkship for Chief Judge Learned Hand of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit to move to Paris, where he worked on the Marshall Plan under W. Averell Harriman until 1949.After returning to the United States, Fisher worked for the Washington, D.C., law firm Covington & Burling from 1950 to 1956, with most of his work dealing with international issues. From 1956 to 1958, he served as an assistant to the U.S. solicitor general in the Department of Justice. In 1957, Fisher argued for the United States in Roth v. United States, a landmark obscenity case, and won.Fisher joined the Harvard Law School faculty in 1958 and became a full professor of law in 1960. In 1976, he became the Samuel Williston Professor of Law. In 1992, he was named a professor emeritus. He also taught at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, the London School of Economics, the Naval War College, Air War College, and the NATO Defense College.During the 1960s, he served as a consultant to John McNaughton, assistant U.S. secretary of defense for international security affairs. Some of his suggestions for ways to end U.S. involvement in Vietnam are documented in “The Pentagon Papers.” Fisher went on to publish a critique of U.S. policy failures in Vietnam in his 1969 book “International Conflict for Beginners.”A strong advocate for using the medium of television as a means to disseminate both legal issues and current events to a broader audience, Fisher proposed the Peabody Award-winning television program “The Advocates” in 1969. The program focused on “stimulating public participation, and understanding, by focusing on realistic choices that must be made in the future, by having both sides of the question presented, and by demonstrating the interest that public officials have in both reasoned arguments and the views of their constituents.” Fisher served as executive producer from 1969 to 1974, and then again from 1978 to1979.In 1970, in connection with a segment of “The Advocates,” Fisher became the last Westerner to interview President Nasser of Egypt, and his questions elicited from Nasser an unexpected willingness to accept a ceasefire with Israel in the “war of attrition” then raging along the Suez Canal. Fisher brought the interview to the attention of Undersecretary of State Elliot Richardson ’47 and thus helped stimulate what became known as the Rogers Plan (named for Nixon’s Secretary of State William Pierce Rogers), which ultimately produced a ceasefire.Through the consulting firms of Conflict Management Inc. and Vantage Partners, and with the nonprofit Conflict Management Group (now part of Mercy Corps), which he co-founded, Fisher taught and advised corporate executives, labor leaders, attorneys, diplomats, and military and government officials on settlement and negotiation strategy.This past April, Fisher was honored for his contributions to Harvard Law School and the field of negotiation with a celebration of his career there. The event also marked the opening of his papers in the Harvard Law School Library’s Historical and Special Collections. The papers, spanning 60 years of Fisher’s career as a lawyer and an academic, include such diverse materials as notes related to his books, as well as his work on the television series “The Advocates.”(See Fisher’s complete bibliography here.)For 62 years, Fisher was married to Caroline McMurtrie Speer, who died in 2010. He is survived by his two sons, Elliott S. Fisher (Harvard College ’74, Harvard Medical School, M.D. ’81, University of Washington, M.P.H. ’85), professor of medicine and director for population health and policy at The Dartmouth Institute; and Peter R. Fisher (Harvard College ’80, Harvard Law School, J.D. ’85), who worked for the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and as undersecretary of the treasury, and is now senior managing director of BlackRock. He is also survived by two brothers, John V. Fisher (Harvard College, S.B. ’42) and Francis D. Fisher (Harvard College, A.B. ’47, Harvard Law School, J.D. ’51), and five grandchildren.In 2002, at a celebration in honor of Fisher’s 80th birthday at Harvard, the late economist John Kenneth Galbraith said of his friend and colleague: “Whenever I thought, ‘Someone should do something about this,’ it eased my conscience to learn that Roger was already working on it.”A memorial service honoring Fisher’s life, work, and memory will be held on Oct. 27 at 11 a.m. in Appleton Chapel at the Memorial Church in Harvard Yard.last_img read more

Napoleon Post Office closed due to mold

first_imgNapoleon, IN— USPS discovered mold at the Napoleon Post Office and operations have been immediately suspended. the Postal Service is temporarily relocating operations from the Napoleon Post Office located at 8949 North US Highway 421, Napoleon, IN 47034 to the Osgood Post Office located at 201 North Walnut Street, Osgood, Indiana 47037.Hours of operations for the Osgood Post Office are Monday through Friday 7:30 am to 4:00 pm and Saturday from 7:30 am to 11:30 am.last_img

Ebo Mends asks David Duncan to resign

first_imgFormer Coach of Asante Kotoko, Ebo Mends, has advised David Duncan to resign from the club because of the unfair treatment meted out to him.Duncan was asked to step aside by the management of the club after Kotoko’s abysmal start to the season which has seen the Porcupines win only one of their matches.However Ebo Mends, who also oversaw a poor start in his reign as Kotoko coach, believes Duncan should resign“Looking at the league table and where Kotoko is lying now, it is very surprising and very worrying but in all, I think Duncan should not be blamed, Mends told Asempa Sports.“Coaching Kotoko is not an easy task and seeing Duncan in this situation I know it not easy for him as a coach because I have also been in this same situation.”“If I am Coach Duncan, I will resign from Kotoko because step aside simply means you are sacked and I don’t understand why the management are failing to tell Duncan to you are fired.” He also revealed that the problem within Kotoko is not always the coach but sometimes the players.“The truth is the problem within Kotoko is not always about the coach but sometimes the players play a part in creating all these problems.”Ebo Mends himself resigned from the club in the 2010 season after a defeat to Hearts of Oak.  –Follow Joy Sports on Twitter: @JoySportsGH. Our hashtag is #JoySportslast_img read more

Clippers don’t mess around as they roll past Memphis

first_img“I don’t think there’s a team that wouldn’t say that, but seeding is very important but it’s nothing to focus on. All we can do is win and even if we win we don’t know what our seedings are,” Clippers Coach Doc Rivers said this past weekend. “I’ve been around long enough to know just play. The basketball gods will tell you where you’re playing. Here’s the thing you know: the West is hard. Doesn’t matter who you play, it’s going to be a hard matchup. For Lakers’ LeBron James, Jacob Blake’s shooting is bigger issue than a big Game 4 victory Clippers vs. Mavericks Game 5 playoff updates from NBA beat reporters Kristaps Porzingis ruled out as Clippers, Mavericks set for Game 5; Follow for game updates Clippers hope they can play to their capabilities, quell Mavericks’ momentum “You just have to play.”That includes on a school night against a losing team missing six rotation players, including former Clipper Avery Bradley, who was swapped for Garrett Temple and JaMychal Green at the trade deadline and was out nursing an injured shin Sunday.“I don’t want to say it was an easy one because this was one of those trap games,” forward Montrezl Harrell said. “This is a team that comes out and plays well who has taken a lot of teams down to the wire, who’s come back on a lot of teams … who hasn’t just laid down and ended their season.“So it was one more of a trap game, but we came out and took care of the things we needed to do as a team.”The Clippers held Memphis to 37.6 percent shooting, outscored them 56-40 in the paint and 61-36 off the bench, and also outrebounded them 47-34.center_img What the Clippers are saying the day after Luka Doncic’s game-winner tied series, 2-2 A game after sitting with a sore ankle, Danilo Gallinari had a season-high 15 rebounds to lead the Clippers, to go with his team-high 27 points, for his seventh double-double this season and 25th of his career. He also made a season-high 14 free throws and, for good measure, added five assists.“Tonight was a good night for me,” Gallinari said. “It was a good night for the team, especially on the second night of a back-to-back. You always want to come out and be aggressive; keeping the intensity up is not easy on the second night.”Green and Temple seemed to enjoy taking it to their friends on their former team, grinning and grinding and combining for 17 points and nine rebounds.“It’s always good to see my old teammates,” said Green, who finished with 15 points and five rebounds in 22 minutes off the bench. “It was good to get some talkin’ in, joking around. It’s fun, there’s a lot of smiles when we get reunited.”The grit part of Memphis’ famous grit-and-grind style of play was in effect early Sunday, as both teams initially struggled to score. It took the Grizzlies (31-46) until the 4:01 mark of the first quarter to break 10 points — at which point the Clippers had put up only 14.But Lou Williams provided his typical scoring pop off the bench with seven quick points in less than four minutes of first-quarter work.The Clippers went on an 8-0 run to start the second quarter, which they won 36-27, and which was highlighted by Harrell’s dependable mitts — the star reserve hauled down a long pass from Wilson Chandler before converting a layup. Ivica Zubac’s right-handed alley-oop flush off a pass from Landry Shamet also got the crowd going before halftime.The Clippers’ lead grew to as many as 26 points in the third quarter before the Grizzlies’ grit got them within 11 points with a little more than five minutes left in the fourth quarter. Then Green buried a 3-pointer in front of Memphis’ bench to make it 103-89 and get his new team pointed back toward another victory.Harrell gave the Clippers 20 points (going 10 for 11 from the free-throw line), for his eighth 20-plus point night in 11 games. Williams finished with 17 points and Zubac added 13.Delon Wright led three Grizzlies in double figures with 20 points.Shamet continued scaling the rookie 3-point charts: His 156th make from distance this season moved him past Juan Carlos Navarro for No. 8 on the all-time leaderboard. Shamet is now one 3-pointer behind Kerry Kittles for No. 7. PreviousMemphis Grizzlies center Jonas Valanciunas, right, shoots as Los Angeles Clippers center Ivica Zubac defends during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, March 31, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Clippers forward Montrezl Harrell, right, shoots as Memphis Grizzlies forward Bruno Caboclo defends during the second half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, March 31, 2019, in Los Angeles. The Clippers won 113-96. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Clippers guard Patrick Beverley, right, offers to help up Memphis Grizzlies center Jonas Valanciunas after Valanciunas was hurt during a play during the second half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, March 31, 2019, in Los Angeles. The Clippers won 113-96. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsMemphis Grizzlies forward Bruno Caboclo, right, shoots as Los Angeles Clippers forward Montrezl Harrell defends during the second half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, March 31, 2019, in Los Angeles. The Clippers won 113-96. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Memphis Grizzlies guard Delon Wright, right, grabs a rebound away from Los Angeles Clippers forward Danilo Gallinari during the second half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, March 31, 2019, in Los Angeles. The Clippers won 113-96. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Memphis Grizzlies forward Bruno Caboclo, right, shoots as Los Angeles Clippers forward JaMychal Green defends during the second half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, March 31, 2019, in Los Angeles. The Clippers won 113-96. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Clippers forward Montrezl Harrell grimaces after drawing a foul during the first half of an NBA basketball game against the Memphis Grizzlies, Sunday, March 31, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Members of the Los Angeles Clippers celebrate from the bench after center Ivica Zubac dunked during the first half of an NBA basketball game against the Memphis Grizzlies, Sunday, March 31, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Clippers forward Danilo Gallinari, center, shoots as Memphis Grizzlies forward Justin Holiday, left, and forward Bruno Caboclo defend during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, March 31, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Clippers guard Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, right, passes as Memphis Grizzlies guard Tyler Dorsey defends during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, March 31, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Memphis Grizzlies guard Tyler Dorsey, left, shoots as Los Angeles Clippers center Ivica Zubac defends during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, March 31, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Clippers guard Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, left, shoots as Memphis Grizzlies forward Bruno Caboclo defends during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, March 31, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Clippers forward Montrezl Harrell, center, is fouled while shooting by Memphis Grizzlies forward Bruno Caboclo, left, as forward Chandler Parsons defends during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, March 31, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Memphis Grizzlies forward Chandler Parsons, left, shoots as Los Angeles Clippers guard Garrett Temple defends during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, March 31, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Memphis Grizzlies center Jonas Valanciunas, right, shoots as Los Angeles Clippers center Ivica Zubac defends during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, March 31, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Clippers forward Montrezl Harrell, right, shoots as Memphis Grizzlies forward Bruno Caboclo defends during the second half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, March 31, 2019, in Los Angeles. The Clippers won 113-96. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)NextShow Caption1 of 14Los Angeles Clippers forward Montrezl Harrell, right, shoots as Memphis Grizzlies forward Bruno Caboclo defends during the second half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, March 31, 2019, in Los Angeles. The Clippers won 113-96. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)ExpandLOS ANGELES — The idea is to not to test the hoops deities.Facing a depleted squad long forgotten from the playoff discussion, the full-strength, fully motivated Clippers opted not to tempt fate, putting away the Memphis Grizzles 113-96 on Sunday at Staples Center.Their 13th victory in 15 games, combined with losses by San Antonio and Oklahoma City, it helped the Clippers further solidify their postseason position. With four regular-season games remaining, the Clippers (47-31) are in sixth place in the Western Conference standings, behind 46-30 Utah.Related Articles Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more