Mack All-Stars claim district title

first_imgThe McKinleyville 8-10 Little League All-Stars clinched the district and section championships this past week, advancing to this weekend’s Northern California state tournament in Palo Alto.The Mack All-Stars opened play at the state tourney against Porterville on Saturday, falling 10-3.They will try to rebound against Fair Oaks Orangevale this afternoon at 4 p.m.last_img

Crabs fall despite Butler’s dominate day

first_imgDavonte Butler pitched a no-hitter through seven innings but it wasn’t enough for the Humboldt Crabs as its offense never got going in a 2-1 loss to the visiting Seattle Studs, Saturday night at the Arcata Ball Park.Despite an eight-strikeout, four-walk no-hitter through seven innings from Butler the Crabs couldn’t keep the Studs off the board as a pair of errors — two pass balls which escaped Crabs catcher Aidan Morris — advanced the Studs’ Antonio Henrickson to third base with one out.A few …last_img

Secularists Treat Abortion Like a Religious Ritual

first_img(Visited 475 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 How can Big Science and the secular materialists who bow before their science altar be so in love with death? It makes no sense.Abortion remains one of the most partisan issues of our time. What makes some humans so eager to kill other humans, especially the vulnerable who cannot fight back? Recent news articles provide some insights into the thinking of pro-abortionists and how they abuse science to support their views.Cecile Richards: Force Christian docs to perform abortions (WND). The retiring head of Planned Parenthood, who was exposed on undercover videos by the Center for Medical Progress for offering baby body parts for sale, is not content to keep the grisly practice confined to her own business. She declared jihad on members of the pro-life community:Richards, in a fundraising email to a pro abortion members [sic] of Planned Parenthood, essentially says that Christians should be forced to perform abortions. She aggressively criticizes the new conscience protections President Donald Trump has put in place to protect the civil rights of Americans who are medical workers who do not want to be forced to perform or assist in abortions.But Richards says protecting pro-life doctors and nurses from being forced to perform abortions is “shameful.” From her fundraising plea entitled “Discrimination, plain and simple. Fight back now:”Teens whose mothers had an abortion are more likely to undergo abortion (Science Daily). This article seems to be just a statistical study, supporting what the headline states. But careful reading shows a clear bias toward the end. The reader hears about “unprotected sex” and “unwanted pregnancies,” and finds a value-laden conclusion: “Whatever the pregnancy outcome, the need to advocate for the health of a young woman is paramount.” It’s as if the baby doesn’t matter at all, nor the father, nor society. The writer pretty much admits this in the last sentence: “Study limitations include a lack of information on the fathers, the marital status and education levels of both mother and daughter, or family dynamics and attitudes.” Would not those factors be crucial to the study? And what about the law? Can the value of life be reduced to a matter of inches in the birth canal? Once the baby is born, most people would be horrified at the thought of infanticide (at least in 2018). Desperate measures are given to babies who make that last inch.Senators Vote Against Late-Term Abortion Ban Despite the Will of Most Americans (Breitbart News). This piece from a conservative news source keeps to the facts, sharing who was for and who was against the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act that failed to pass the Senate last week, to the disappointment of President Trump and most pro-life Republicans in Congress. What’s instructive for our analysis is the reasoning of Planned Parenthood about this bill against the backdrop [of] scientific evidence that late-term babies feel pain, which means that late-term abortions are acts of torture as well as death. The failure to pass this common-sense bill leaves the US among 7 nations that still allow late-term abortions, including China and North Korea. But the nation’s leading abortion provider does not even try to invoke scientific evidence for their position. To pro-lifers, the situation looks hideous:Planned Parenthood tweeted #StopTheBans to condemn the prohibition on abortion past the fifth month of pregnancy. The abortion vendor also condemned the U.S. House’s passage of a bill that would require abortionists to immediately provide emergency medical care to an infant born alive during an abortion.Effectiveness and safety of early medication abortion provided in pharmacies by auxiliary nurse-midwives (PLoS One). The attitude of clinical detachment from the issues in this paper should strike pro-lifers as disturbing. The nine ‘researchers’ seem intent on pushing medical-induced abortion on women in Nepal by the most effective means possible. Abortion is hidden under euphemisms about “reproductive health technologies” which is not (as one might presume) just about contraception or infertility treatments. No; the authors are concerned about “unsafe abortion care” in their package of “reproductive health technologies.” They don’t want to stop abortion as much as encourage “abortion effectiveness and safety,” particularly by improving women’s access to trained midwives. Wait; aren’t midwives supposed to help women give birth? Try to imagine this kind of dispassionate statement in a Nazi journal about safe and effective gas chambers for Jew killers.Despite improvements in access to safe abortion care in Nepal, women continue to face obstacles to safe abortion and to seek care from unskilled providers, with access to safe care particularly constrained in rural regions. This study provides data supporting the expansion of medication abortion services to registered pharmacy settings when care is provided by an appropriately trained ANM [auxiliary nurse midwife]. Future research should build on these findings by investigating ways to safely implement pharmacy ANM provision at scale and monitor quality of care provided.Et tu, Clergy?  Clergy ‘Bless’ Late-Term Abortion Clinic (Breitbart News). Readers may find this statement hard to believe, but some members of the ‘clergy’ offered a ‘blessing’ on a new clinic that specializes in late-term abortions—you know, the kind that tortures unborn infants before killing them.A group of clergy joined together to “bless” and declare “holy” a new abortion clinic that performs third trimester abortions and is run by notorious abortionist LeRoy Carhart.“God of grace and God of glory, in whom we move and live,” said Baptist minister Carlton Veazey, beginning a prayer for abortionists and other staff and their patients, reports the Washington Post.“Keep them safe and keep them strong,” he continued. “And may they always know that all that they do is for Thy glory.”Following these quotes, the article turns up the shock with additional quotes from Jewish, Presbyterian and other ‘Christian’ denominations trying to justify their blessing. In her 2006 book Godless, outspoken news analyst Ann Coulter made the audacious claim that to liberals, abortion is a ‘sacrament.’ It doesn’t sound that audacious any more.Bill Maher quote, by J. B. Greene (used by permission).What drives this visceral attitude by secular liberals to ‘protect a woman’s right to choose’? What makes them so casual about killing other human beings? Part of it is belief that the world is overpopulated, and that more human births are ‘unsustainable’ for the planet. But an undeniable common thread is evolution.Jerry Bergman has documented this in his book How Darwinism Corrodes Morality, chs. 4-5, with a damning account of Margaret Sanger’s Darwinian, racist and eugenics beliefs (she was the founder of Planned Parenthood). John West concurs in his book Darwin Day in America, chs. 14-15. Evolution devalues human life. We are just animals.No; humans are worse. Humans are weeds. Look at this paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences: “Early hominids may have been weed species.” If that is what the authors, Richard S. Meindl, Morgan E. Chaney and C. Owen Lovejoy, think of hominids, what do they think of us today? Logically, weeds give birth to weeds. Why not pull out the weeds on the planet?Throughout the years, CEH has pointed to paper after scientific paper that commits reductionism, reducing human beings to chemicals. Here are more that appeared recently:A neurochemical hypothesis for the origin of hominids (PNAS). If our ancestors originated from chemicals, even neurochemicals, what rights do they have? What dignity? Here’s a sample from this paper revealing that the materialist secular authors do NOT have the science on their side: just imagination and a worldview where no intelligence is allowed:It has always been difficult to account for the evolution of certain human characters such as language, empathy, and altruism via individual reproductive success. However, the striatum, a subcortical region originally thought to be exclusively motor, is now known to contribute to social behaviors and “personality styles” that may link such complexities with natural selection.In other words, the matter in this brain region gives rise to the good, the true, and the beautiful. This kind of self-refuting theorizing is very common in the secular scientific literature. It’s self-refuting, because it means that their own paper has no anchor in something eternal; it evolves. It is also self-refuting because it reduces thought to matter in motion. What does matter in motion know about anything?Another less obvious self-refutation in the pro-abortion scientific leftist community is the myth that reducing population is good for the planet. Where did that idea of ‘good’ come from? Darwinism knows nothing of good. Even survival is not morally good. If humans kill off everything else, then go extinct themselves, who is to say that is bad? The party was fun while it lasted.Dr Eric Pianka, ardent evolutionist and genocide advocate, by J B Greene (used by permission).The notion of good and evil, which is so innate in mankind, is irreducible to matter (see Michael Egnor’s commentary in Evolution News). Its presence in all cultures and times is testimony to the fact that each human being, even a leftist liberal, has a soul and a conscience—just like the Bible says. We had better pay attention to the fact that the author of that book was pro-life.To end on an encouraging note, the Trump administration and conservative Congress is on a roll to increase religious freedom. Trump would have signed the Pain-Capable bill had a few Senators voted the right way. It may come up again, and we should encourage them to protect the unborn. Also, Crisis Pregnancy Centers are poised to do better this year than they fared under the previous administration. One located in your Editor’s hometown is moving into a new facility after a successful fund-raising campaign. At least 51% of Americans say they are now pro-life, and even more favor some restrictions on abortion. This is a winnable war (for life), despite the 60 million abortions that have occurred since Roe v. Wade. Support the Crisis Pregnancy Centers near you. Unlike Planned Parenthood, which still gets over half a billion dollars a year from the US Government even after the undercover videos revealed their crimes, Crisis Pregnancy Centers get no money from the government and rely entirely on donations. They, and the women they serve, and the lives they save, deserve your support.last_img read more

Smart cities have the ability — and responsibility — to tackle social issues

first_imgFor Self-Driving Systems, Infrastructure and In… Surveillance at the Heart of Smart Cities How IoT Will Play an Important Role in Traffic … Related Posts How Connected Communities Can Bolster Your Busi…center_img Tags:#Columbus#featured#Internet of Things#IoT#Smart Cities#smart city#top#USDOT Justin Bean With the amount of data available today, cities are constantly innovating, finding new ways to apply insights in ways that benefit citizens. This is no small task, as new technologies are constantly reshaping what’s possible when it comes to using and making sense of data.Data creates opportunities. Cities are rife with challenges that not only impact their own residents but society at large. IoT, artificial intelligence and machine learning technologies are now poised to address some of the most pressing social challenges, like homelessness, transportation and public safety. See also: Is location intelligence the key to citizen-centric smart cities?As cities find new ways to analyze data and extract insights that help solve some of their most immediate challenges, they’re also creating promising assets for tackling issues beyond their borders. Whether it’s Copenhagen’s increase in smart technologies to reduce emissions or New York’s efforts to modernize its subway and ferry systems, cities and the organizations that work with them are tackling issues that have implications on citizens around the world. Locally accountable and locally empoweredCities are the source of 80% of our global gross domestic product, 70% of emissions, and consume 66% of our energy. Urban populations are expected to nearly double by the middle of the century, according to the United Nations. This makes cities critical in addressing today’s global economic, social, and environmental challenges. Cities have their own priorities and are able to explore solving their own challenges with smart technologies. When cities are empowered use such technology to solve local issues, and subsequently share their successes with other cities, we will have the capacity to address global challenges collectively. As we saw in 2006, with cities signing up for the Kyoto Protocol, and more recently, with cities supporting Paris Accord carbon reduction targets, local governments can act within their own districts but impact the world. City officials have connections to their constituents, local businesses, and organizations. When local officials are successful at addressing local needs, they are strongly supported, and even adored, by their citizens. This aligns interests between the community and its elected officials, and puts those local politicians in powerful positions; officials then have the ability to directly influence change. Cities are responsible for their residents and need to use all available tools and technologies to better the lives of their residents. Mayor Ed Lee of San Francisco understood that homelessness in his city needed to be addressed in a substantial way, so he launched the Navigation Center to offer shelter to those without a home. The initiative includes a “joint database in which all the departments and organizations involved with it pool shelter guest information, giving case managers real-time access to integrated data.” By sharing data across multiple organizations, the city can now respond quickly to help city residents in need. Similarly, the smaller City of Moreno Valley, Calif. responded to citizens’ concern with crime in local parks. After the city implemented a state-of-the-art public safety system, citizens reported that they felt safe again, and are returning to the parks for barbecues and family gatherings. It takes a villageAs cities tackle a diverse set of issues, from energy efficiency to traffic blocks to homelessness, it’s critical that solutions and insights don’t stay in a bubble. Sharing both with other municipalities working on similar challenges will only improve the standard of living around the world. In recent years, cities have deployed a number of technologies to become smarter and to run more efficiently. Using sensors built into streetlights, for example, Barcelona is able to keep an eye on the amount of rainfall in a given area to ensure the sprinkler systems only run when needed. In Copenhagen, the driverless metro trains will soon respond to demand in real time thanks to IoT sensors in stations that analyze demand data for various rail services, helping the city to improve service while saving on energy and operational costs. These types of technologies are only some of the innovative solutions being adopted by smart cities today, enabling the gathering of an enormous amount of information. One of the most under-used sources of data available to cities today is video. Thanks to innovations in video analytics, this already abundant source of data can often be used to do everything, from analyzing traffic situations to automatically alerting the police and firefighters when there are public safety incidents that need attention.There is no shortage of data available to decision makers, but one of the challenges is actually determining how to filter through all the available data and use it in the most beneficial way. The more data shared across internal agencies and organizations, as well as with local businesses and non profits, the more room there will be for innovation to take place, and the more effective cities can be with the resources they have. Cities must learn from each other to avoid making similar mistakes that could hinder progress, and to effectively create the future they seek.In 2016, Columbus, Ohio was granted significant funding by the government after winning the Smart City Challenge, a contest held by the U.S. Department of Transportation to improve transportation systems states. Ohio has since become a case study for other regions interested in improving their mobility systems and instituting sustainable transportation.Smart cities can also help other cities that have not added significant IoT capabilities. Cities that are still learning how to adapt to emerging technologies will benefit from the best practices of cities that have already implemented them. This will allow a greater number of communities to work toward solving challenges that can have positive implications for society as a whole. Smart cities are learning how to become “smarter” every day. Working together, they are now poised to solve some of society’s greatest challenges. The more cities we have working toward the greater good, the more resilient and prosperous our increasingly global civilization will be as a whole.last_img read more

If You Would Give Anything

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 3rd book: Eat Their Lunch “The first ever playbook for B2B salespeople on how to win clients and customers who are already being serviced by your competition.” Buy Now Would you give up your comfort for the discomfort of looking at ideas and beliefs you disagree with if it meant new choices and new results? Could you give up your strongest held beliefs?Would you give up your experience and your ability to take the role of beginner? Would you assume the role of student? Is it possible to give up what you have learned to take in new information and gain new experiences?Could you abandon the habits you’ve developed over a lifetime and trade them in for new habits, even if it meant devoting yourself to building them over the next 6 months? If this is what you had to do to have what you really want, could you?Are you willing to try something new even if you risked failing—or even embarrassing yourself in the process of practicing something necessary to move you closer to your goals?Will you give yourself the same advice you would give others if they needed to embrace the discomfort of ideas they don’t like, give up the competencies they’ve gained over time, develop new and difficult to run in habits, and risk failing and maybe even a loss of face if it meant they would attain their goals.If what you are doing now was enough for you to meet your goals, you would already have those goals. You can have anything you want, provided you are willing to pay the price and persist long enough to have it. Part of paying that price means giving up your comfort, your beliefs, your experience, and your habits. It means you take on new information, even information, ideas, and beliefs you have resisted—and maybe vehemently and publicly opposed.To have what you want, you don’t have to give anything, but you do have to give what is necessary—and what is necessary isn’t always easy to give.last_img read more