US — RSF launches #PressFreedomPact ahead of November 2020 elections

first_img WhatsApp blocks accounts of at least seven Gaza Strip journalists September 28, 2020 – Updated on September 30, 2020 US — RSF launches #PressFreedomPact ahead of November 2020 elections Campaigns United StatesAmericas Online freedomsMedia independenceEvents Building on RSF’s eight press freedom recommendations for candidates, the #PressFreedomPact seeks to defend the vital role of the free press by asking candidates to publicly affirm their commitment to the principles of press freedom as upheld by the First Amendment. The #PressFreedomPact provides a key opportunity for the nation’s political leaders to address the need to protect press freedoms at home — and to set a better example abroad. “We launch this campaign at a crucial moment, with press freedom under greater attack than ever before in the United States and globally. These elections are the moment to turn that around — to begin to rectify the damage that has been done to the United States’ own press freedom record, and to set a more positive example for the rest of the world,” said RSF Director of International Campaigns Rebecca Vincent.To publicly demonstrate their commitment to protecting press freedom, RSF is asking all candidates running for public office — in the presidential, congressional, and local elections taking place on November 3rd — to sign the #PressFreedomPact, stating:“I commit to uphold the principles of the First Amendment in my words and actions, my domestic and international policy and in my governance, to protect the vital role of the free press in American democracy, and to lead by example in upholding democratic values throughout the world.”“The #PressFreedomPact provides a much-needed opportunity for candidates to publicly commit to protecting press freedom. As their first debate opens, we challenge President Donald Trump and Joe Biden to lead by example by being the first to sign the #PressFreedomPact,” said RSF USA advocacy manager, Daphne Pellegrino.RSF has worked with the advertising agency BETC in developing this campaign, which will be promoted in key US media and on social media — starting with live-tweeting during the September 29 presidential debate. The United States is ranked 45th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2020 World Press Freedom Index.Notes:In the run-up to the 2020 elections, please visit RSF’s campaign webpage for updates, press freedom alerts, and to see which of your elected officials have signed the #PressFreedomPact. For candidates who wish to discuss the #PressFreedomPact, RSF’s press freedom recommendations, or RSF’s broader press freedom concerns both in the United States and globally, please contact RSF USA advocacy manager Daphne Pellegrino at dpellegrino(a)rsf.org or via telephone at (202) 813-9497, extension 2. For press or media inquiries related to this campaign, please contact RSF USA communications manager Collin Boylin at cboylin(a)rsf.org or via telephone at (202) 813-9497, extension 3.  April 28, 2021 Find out more NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say United StatesAmericas Online freedomsMedia independenceEvents As the first 2020 presidential debate opens in the United States, Reporters Without Borders (RSF) has launched the “#PressFreedomPact,” a campaign challenging candidates running for office in November’s elections to publicly commit to upholding the principles of press freedom. RSF_en Help by sharing this information to go further News Follow the news on United States Organisation June 7, 2021 Find out more June 3, 2021 Find out more Facebook’s Oversight Board is just a stopgap, regulation urgently needed, RSF says News News Receive email alertslast_img read more

Notice: Proposed criminal procedure rule

first_imgThe Florida Bar Criminal Procedure Rules Committee has filed with the Florida Supreme Court an emergency petition proposing new Florida Rule of Criminal Procedure 3.203 (Defendant’s Mental Retardation as a Bar to the Imposition of Death Sentence) and proposing amendments to Florida Rule of Criminal Procedure 3.704 (The Criminal Punishment Code). Rule 3.203 is necessary due to 2001 legislation that created section 921.137, Florida Statutes (2001), which provides a new defense and prohibits the imposition of the death penalty on a mentally retarded defendant. See ch. 2001-202, Laws of Fla. The new rule would provide procedures and guidance for defendants, the State of Florida, and the trial courts. The proposed amendments to rule 3.704 are to make the rule consistent with the legislative amendments to section 921.0021, Florida Statutes (2001), made in ch. 2001-210, Laws of Fla. The amendments to rule 3.704 would expand the consideration of a juvenile offender’s prior offenses to include five years of prior offenses, rather than the current three-year period.The court invites all interested persons to comment on the committee’s proposed amendments, which are reproduced in full below, as well as online at www.flcourts.org/sct/sctdocs/proposed.html. An original and seven copies of all comments must be filed with the court on or before August 1, with a certificate of service verifying that a copy has been served on the committee chair, Raymond J. Rafool, II, P.O. Box 7286, Winter Haven 33883-7286, as well as a separate request for oral argument if the person filing the comment wishes to participate in oral argument, which may be scheduled in this case. IN THE SUPREME COURT OF FLORIDA AMENDMENTS TO THE FLORIDA RULES OF CRIMINAL PROCEDURE, CASE NO. SC02-1230 RULE 3.203. DEFENDANT’S MENTAL RETARDATION AS A BAR TO IMPOSITION OF DEATH SENTENCE (a) Notice of Intent to Raise Mental Retardation as Bar to Imposition of Death Sentence; Time for Filing; Contents. A defendant who intends to raise mental retardation as a bar to the imposition of a death sentence shall give written notice to the prosecutor not less than 20 days before trial or at such other time as ordered by the court. The notice shall contain the names and addresses of any experts whom the defendant may call to testify at a hearing to determine mental retardation. (b) Motion for Determination of Mental Retardation; Time for Filing After Recommendation of Death. A defendant who has given timely notice under subdivision (a) of this rule may file a motion for determination of mental retardation within 10 days after an advisory jury has recommended a death sentence. (c) Motion for Determination of Mental Retardation; Time for Filing After Recommendation of Life. The prosecutor shall notify the defendant, within 10 days after an advisory jury has returned a recommended sentence of life, if the state intends to seek a sentence of death. A defendant who has given timely notice under subdivision (a) of this rule may file a motion for determination of mental retardation within 10 days after receiving notice that the state intends to seek a death sentence. (d) Motion for Determination of Mental Retardation; Time for Filing After Waiver of Advisory Jury Recommendation. A defendant who waives the right to a penalty phase jury may file a motion for determination of mental retardation no later than 10 days after completion of the penalty phase hearing. (e) Appointment of Experts; Time of Examination. The court shall appoint 2 experts in the field of mental retardation upon the receipt of the motion for determination of mental retardation. The experts shall evaluate the defendant and provide to the court and the parties a written report of their findings. The reports shall be provided a reasonable time prior to the final sentencing hearing. Attorneys for the state and defendant may be present at the examinations. (f) Defendant’s Refusal to Cooperate. If the defendant refuses to be examined by or fully cooperate with the court-appointed experts, the court may, in its discretion: (1) order the defense to allow the court-appointed experts to review all mental health reports, tests, and evaluations by the defendant’s expert; or (2) prohibit defense experts from testifying concerning any tests, evaluations, or examinations of the defendant regarding the defendant’s mental retardation. (g) Hearing on Motion to Determine Mental Retardation. At the hearing on the motion, the court shall consider the findings of the court-appointed experts, the findings of any other expert offered by the state or the defense, and all other evidence on the issue of whether the defendant has mental retardation. If the court finds, by clear and convincing evidence, that the defendant has mental retardation as defined in section 921.137, Florida Statutes (2001), the court may not impose a sentence of death. The court shall enter a written order that sets forth with specificity the findings in support of the court’s determination. RULE 3.704. THE CRIMINAL PUNISHMENT CODE (a) – (c) (no change) (d) General Rules and Definitions. (1) – (13) (no change) (14) “Prior record” refers to any conviction for an offense committed by the offender prior to the commission of the primary offense. Prior record includes convictions for offenses committed by the offender as an adult or as a juvenile, convictions by federal, out of state, military, or foreign courts and convictions for violations of county or municipal ordinances that incorporate by reference a penalty under state law. Federal, out of state, military or foreign convictions are scored at the severity level at which the analogous or parallel Florida crime is located. (A) (no change) (B) Juvenile dispositions of offenses committed by the offender within 5 3 years prior to the date of the commission of the primary offense must be scored as prior record if the offense would have been a crime if committed by an adult. Juvenile dispositions of sexual offenses committed by the offender more than 5 3 years prior to the date of the primary offense must be scored as prior record if the offender has not maintained a conviction-free record, either as an adult or as a juvenile, for a period of 5 3 consecutive years from the most recent date of release from confinement, supervision, or sanction, whichever is later, to the date of commission of the primary offense. (C) – (E) (no change) (15) – (28) (no change) Committee Notes The terms must and shall, as used in this rule, are mandatory and not permissive. 2001 Amendment. 3.704(d)(14)(B). The definition of “prior record” was amended to include juvenile dispositions of offenses committed within 5 years prior to the date of the commission of the primary offense. “Prior record” was previously defined to include juvenile disposition of offenses committed within 3 years prior to the date of the commission of the primary offense. This amendment reflects the legislative change to section 921.0021, Florida Statutes, effective July 1, 2001. This new definition of prior record applies to primary offenses committed on or after July 1, 2001. Notice: Proposed criminal procedure rule Notice: Proposed criminal procedure rulecenter_img July 1, 2002 Noticeslast_img read more

Tipperary well represented in Aga Khan team

first_imgGreg Broderick on MH Going Global – who will represent Ireland in the Rio Olympics next month – and Denis Lynch on board All Star 5 will fly the flag for the Premier County.Joining them in their bid to retain the Aga Khan Trophy will be Cian O’Connor and Bertram Allen.The event gets underway at 3 o’clock in the RDS with Ireland drawn 3rd to jump of the 8 teams competing.last_img