Why Combating Ocean Plastics is our Business

first_imgEighteen months ago, I sat in a conference room with my Dell colleagues as Adrian Grenier, our social good advocate, shared his passion for the oceans.  At the time, our general consensus was that “oceans aren’t Dell’s thing.” But the more we learned, the more we realized how wrong we were.The ocean is the most important regulator of our global climate. It is also the primary food source for more than 3.5 billion people around the globe. So to borrow a line from Ocean Unite, the ocean is everyone’s business. Last week, Dell attended The Economist’s World Ocean Summit, an annual gathering of top researchers, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), government officials, and corporations for the purpose of finding solutions to ocean issues. At first, attendees were quite surprised to see Dell there.“You’re here with Dell, as in the tech company?” asked one attendee.  Let me explain.Dell runs one of the largest global supply chains in the world. As such, we are consumers of plastic. But we’ve also spent a decade finding sustainable alternatives to plastic, such as recycled carbon fiber, post-consumer recycled plastics, bamboo, and wheat straw.Last month, we hit our 2020 goal of using 50 million pounds of sustainable materials in our products. And we’re 93 percent of the way toward our goal of 100 percent sustainable packaging. So we know a thing about operationalizing and scaling sustainable solutions.We think we can use a lot of ocean plastic in our supply chain. And we think others could as well.Quickly the sentiment changed to: “So Dell probably knows more about how to recycle ocean plastics than anyone else in this room.”We hope that’s the case. It’s why we’ve announced our industry’s first ocean bound plastic packaging pilot for our signature consumer laptop, the XPS 13 2-in-1.  You can learn more about our approach and program in this white paper and video.What Dell has introduced is a good start, but it’s not the complete answer. We need more businesses engaged to address the issue at scale. We must support local infrastructure in key markets with high concentrations of ocean plastic, and we need to make the economics work for everyone. It will be no easy feat, but through collaboration, it is a solvable problem.We are all consumers and users of plastics. We must also be part of the solution. Join us.&nbsp;</p><p>last_img read more

Lecturer explores technology and inequality

first_imgLawrence Mishel, president of the Economic Policy Institute, spoke in Geddes Hall on Wednesday night. Mishel’s lecture, entitled “Beyond Technology and Globalization: The Reset of the Rules of the Labor Market,” addressed income inequality in the United States and was part of the Chuck Craypo memorial series, “Combining Research and Activism for Social Justice.”According to current director of the Higgins Labor Program at the Center for Social Concerns Daniel Graff, the late Chuck Craypo was an economics professor at Notre Dame, as well as the founder and first director of the Higgins program in 1993.“Chuck Craypo devoted his career of research, teaching and activism to improving the lives of working people,” Graff said. “And to honor his legacy, in 2013-14 the Higgins program initiated a biannual series to bring researchers and activists to Notre Dame’s campus to deliver lectures, lead workshops and foster conversations around compelling themes related to questions of work and social justice.”Mishel began his lecture by defining economics as “about who gets what and why,”and noting that income inequality has ballooned since the 1970s.He said that until this past year, Democrats have focused too intently on technology and globalization, considering both uncontrollable and subsequently viewing income inequality as “God-given,” rather than an addressable issue.Mishel also took issue that Republicans have chosen to focus on economic opportunity rather than income inequality. Mishel acknowledged that the United States does have an opportunity problem, however he stated that prioritizing it over income inequality is illogical, as economic opportunity can’t be improved until income inequality is improved thereby allowing for standards of living and educational opportunity to improve and lead to better economic opportunity.“So what else caused the wage problems if it wasn’t technology and it’s not just globalization?” Mishel said. “It’s the rules of the labor market have been reset over the last 40 years.”Mishel outlined several factors that have contributed to these rules changing.The first factor is unemployment, which, according to Mishel, has been rising over the past 30 years.“Unemployment weakens the bargain power of all workers,” he said. “If [employers] can get whoever they want for whatever they feel like paying, wages are gonna go nowhere.”The second factor is unions, Mishel said.“We have eroded collective bargaining a tremendous amount since the early 1970s,” Mishel said. “It used to be that if you had … an industry and 30-50 percent of the workers in that industry were union, they negotiated collective bargain agreements that the non-union employers accepted … because they didn’t want their workers unionizing or they didn’t want their workers to leave and go to the union sector. So unions were always able to take wages out of competition.”The third factor Mishel listed was minimum wage, which he said is more than 25 percent below what is was in 1968 [factoring in inflation] even though productivity has more than doubled and low-wage workers are, on average, more educated than 50 years ago.“If you increase the minimum wage to $12 … by 2020, that may sound relatively modest,” Mishel said. “But it’s actually a reasonably bold policy. $12 minimum wage would affect 25 percent of the work force. So we’re not just talking about a few people lying at the bottom.”The fourth factor is undocumented workers. According to Mishel, the United States is currently home to eight million undocumented workers, who make up “around 5 percent of the workforce.”“If you have 5 percent of your workforce who are exploitable and exploited, they undercut the labor standards,” Mishel said. “So it would be to our general benefit to make them not exploitable.”“What are you supposed to draw from this?” Mishel asked the audience. “The first thing you should know is that what this means is that if workers have not been getting ahead in terms of their pay, it’s not because we haven’t produced a lot of income and wealth. We have produced a lot of income and wealth. It just hasn’t gone to the vast majority.”Tags: Center for Social Concerns, Chuck Craypo memorial lecture, Higgins Labor Studies Program, income inequalitylast_img read more

NFF sanctions NPFL 2019/2020 final table

first_imgRelatedPosts COVID-19: NCAA to revoke erring airlines licence over non-compliance FRSC to Schools: We’ll arrest, prosecute drivers who flout COVID-19 rules Sanwo-Olu: We’re committed to fulfilling promises to Lagosians The Football Committee of the Nigeria Football Federation has endorsed the final table of the Nigeria Professional Football League for the 2019/2020 season as prepared and released by the League Management Company.The decision was taken at a virtual meeting held at the instance of the President of the NFF, Amaju Melvin Pinnick, to deliberate on all the issues arising from the forced ending to the season by COVID-19. On the agreement reached by all stakeholders to use the Points-Per-Game to determine the final table and the subsequent petition by Rivers United FC, the Committee unanimously recommended that the NFF Executive Committee endorses the LMC decision and the Final Table for the 2019/2020 season in line with the NFF Statutes.It also charged the LMC to work out its calendar to ensure that very minimal number of matches are postponed for Clubs taking part in continental competitions.As part of its consultations on the matter, the NFF reached out to both continental-governing body, CAF, and world-governing body, FIFA, whose responses affirmed the position of the NFF Football Committee.The said meeting of the NFF Football Committee reviewed the following: “The process followed by the LMC from May 2020 when the NFF approved the decision to end the NPFL 2019/2020 season at Match day 25 due to the Covid-19 Pandemic, to July 2020 when it approved the NPFL table based on the PPG system with the top three teams to represent Nigeria in the 2020/2021 CAF Inter-Clubs Competitions.“The relevant provisions of the NPFL Rule Book that the LMC relied upon to end the season and adopt the PPG. “The Petition from Rivers Utd proposing for the LMC to use the Goal difference to break the tie.“The LMC’s response to Rivers Utd Petition seeking to clarify the issues and stating the basis of its decision.”Tags: Amaju Melvin PinnickCOVID-19LMCNFFnpflSanctionVirtual Meetinglast_img read more