QPR v Northampton: Changes for Rangers and youngster is among subs

first_imgEmbed from Getty ImagesMatt Smith and Idrissa Sylla start for QPR at Loftus Road, where Steven Caulker plays a first-team match for the first time since last October.Keeper Matt Ingram and midfielders Ariel Borysiuk and Ryan Manning are among those also brought into the side for the League Cup first round tie.Rangers’ substitutes include Belgian youngster Ilias Chair, a midfielder the club signed earlier this year.QPR: Ingram, Furlong, Onuoha, Caulker, Robinson, Freeman, Manning, Borysiuk, Ngbakoto, Sylla, Smith.Subs: Lumley, Baptiste, Petrasso, Luongo, Chair, Wszolek, Washington. Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img

Agricultural groups concerned about effects of import tariffs on steel and aluminum

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest In early March, President Trump announced plans to impose tariffs on imported steel and aluminum, action that many agriculture and business organizations warned will have negative consequences.The restrictions are being imposed as a national security measure, according to the administration, which has raised concerns about U.S. reliance on imported steel for defense systems.In a letter to the president, the groups said remedies to curb steel and aluminum imports included in a report issued by Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross are “overly broad and will have a severe detrimental impact on downstream users of steel and aluminum.” The restrictions will lead to lost American jobs and could lead to retaliation, including on agriculture exports, from U.S. trading partners, the organizations cautioned.The National Pork Producers Council is also concerned about possible administration action — not sanctioned by the World Trade Organization — against China related to technology transfer and intellectual property. Liu He, a top trade adviser to Chinese President Xi Jinping, met in Washington with U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer, Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin and White House economic adviser Gary Cohn to discuss the so-called 301 case and the tariffs on steel and aluminum. China is a major exporter of the products to the United States.The U.S. Wheat Associates (USW) and the National Association of Wheat Growers (NAWG) are extremely disappointed in the decision because of the risks of retaliation and the precedent set by such a policy have serious potential consequences for agriculture.“This announcement invites retaliation that we are deeply concerned will hurt American farmers. These tariffs are very likely to accelerate a tit-for-tat approach on trade, putting U.S. agricultural exports in the crosshairs. Already we have seen China discuss tariffs on sorghum. The EU and China have also indicated they will move forward with swift retaliation in the wake of these tariffs,” said Brian Kuehl, Executive Director of Farmers for Free Trade.“Everyone agrees we need to hold our trading partners accountable, but taking unilateral action to raise tariffs carries harmful unintended consequences. The agriculture sector knows from experience that our ag exports are the first to be hit by retaliation. Whether it’s our chickens in retaliation for tariffs on Chinese tires, or U.S. apples and wine exports as a result of a Mexican trucking dispute, historically, agriculture always has the biggest target on its back.”last_img read more

How to Keep Dropbox Employees’ Hands Off Your Data

first_imgYesterday Dropbox, the popular file storage Web application that enables users to easily sync a folder from their local computer with the the cloud, made a small change to its terms of service. Dropbox made it clear that it would decrypt and hand-over files if the U.S. government requested it.The issue is not so much that Dropbox is willing to hand over user data to the feds if requested – as RedMonk co-founder and analyst James Governor points out, the company doesn’t have much choice: “given I understand it runs on Amazon Web Services, which would give up the data if asked anyway.” The real issue, it seems, is that Dropbox has the ability to snoop on your encrypted files at all.Other Web-based backup services, such as JungleDisk (owned by Rackspace) and Mozy (owned by EMC and managed by VMware) give customers control over their encryption keys. That means that employees working on these services won’t be able to snoop on customers’ files, or turn it over to any government body.But as Governor points out, these services don’t do what Dropbox does. I use JungleDisk to backup my local files to the cloud. I use Dropbox to make it easy for me to access a smaller set of files on any device I happen to be using – my laptop, my Android phone or someone else’s computer.There’s still the option for users to encrypt their files themselves using a tool like Truecrypt before putting them in their Dropbox folders. You can learn how to do this here. But it seems this creates an opportunity for a competitor – like Box or Syncplicity – to offer and advertise simple encryption that the companies can’t access.For some background reading on why Dropbox has the ability to decrypt users’ files, see this article by Christopher Soghoian.For an enterprise look at the same issue – storing encrypted files in the cloud – see our article 5 Resources for Migrating to the Cloud Securely.Small businesses will want to take a look at our article How to Keep Company Data Safe on Employees’ Personal Devices.Update: Dropbox has issued the following statement in response:Every Dropbox employee understands that the most important value of the company is maintaining users’ trust. Employees are prohibited by company policy from accessing users’ files and there are technical access controls to prohibit unauthorized access by employees. As with almost every other online company, there are a limited number of employees who may access user data when legally required to do so, and to help troubleshoot users’ accounts with their consent.Let me know if you have any questions and thanks for considered Dropbox’s side of the story!I didn’t mean to imply that Dropbox employees were allowed to snoop through your files willy nilly. I never doubted whether Dropbox had explicit policies regarding who could access customers’ files, or that it only a very small number of people had the technical capability to do so. But having anyone able to decrypt your files and hand them over to anyone, legal order or not, is a problem here. Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market klint finleycenter_img Tags:#cloud#Cloud Providers Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Related Posts last_img read more

Why You Cannot Match Your Competitor’s Price

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Now Let’s say you and your competitors both sell the same thing to your customers. You both buy the same raw materials to develop your product. You both pay $100 for those raw materials. You sell your product for $150, and your competitor sells theirs for $130. Your higher price is enough to cause some buyers to buy from your competitor. All things being equal, they’re right to pay the lower price.But all things are not equal. The product that you sell is superior to your competitor’s. You invest more to develop the final product, it is of far superior quality, it lasts longer, and your customers don’t have to buy it as frequently. More still, your sales team is out teaching your customers how to get even more out of the product and saving them money. Your competitor has a lower price, but you have a lower cost. Why? because you create greater value.But you lose a significant amount of deals to your competitor. Some prospects don’t understand how paying more can cost them less. You are faced with a choice. You can either more effectively sell the value you create, or you can eliminate price as an objection. It’s easier to lower your price than it is to sell better.You match the $130. Now you have less profit to support your sales model, and you can no longer spend time teaching your clients how to save money. You also have less money to develop the product the way you had been, and so you and your competitor are now equal.But every action has an equal and opposite reaction. Your competitor was selling lowest price. That was their business strategy. So they lower their price to $120, taking back the price advantage on which they were competing. Your customers still demand the same level of service and support, and you don’t understand how your competitor can deliver anything of value at that price. But now you’ve given up competing on the greater value you create, so you match the $120, imagining there is no way your competitor can lower their price again. But you are wrong. They lower their price to $110.This is how sales organizations, salespeople, and whole industries are commoditized. If you have chosen low price as your strategy, then you need to compete by eliminating costs and providing the lowest price in all cases. But if you have decided to sell the additional value you create, the value that makes you different, then you need to focus on selling more effectively.Reducing your price to increase your revenue is one way to go about increased sales. But that choice comes with reduced margins. You may indeed end up increasing your sales and selling more while building a far less profitable, and less valuable business. And you might also build a business that doesn’t make a difference in the end.last_img read more