Womens volleyball Hoosiers upset Buckeyes in Bloomington

Members of the OSU women’s volleyball team during a game against Michigan on Nov. 14 at St. John Arena. OSU lost 3-0. Credit: Lantern file photoA third-set Buckeye effort wasn’t enough to stop the Indiana Hoosiers from swiping a win from the Ohio State women’s volleyball team on Saturday. Indiana took home the 3-1 victory on their home court, while No. 22 OSU fell to 15-11 overall on the season and 5-9 in the Big Ten. The loss tallies two in a row for the Buckeyes, dropping a match to Wisconsin prior to their faceoff with the Hoosiers. OSU has just six remaining matches in the regular season. The Buckeyes will see three of those teams for the first time this season. A week ago, junior outside hitter Luisa Schirmer said that allowing teams to go on three or four-point runs is ruinous for the Buckeyes. In the first set alone, the Hoosiers went on three three-point runs and created a hole for OSU. Near the conclusion of the first set, the Buckeyes pulled within two points but it was the deadly three-point deficit that came back to haunt them. The Hoosiers took the first set, 25-22. The second set was anchored offensively by sophomore outside hitter Audra Appold, who swung for 10 kills. Even with impressive statistics, the Buckeyes were doomed to play catch-up nearly the entire set. However, OSU rallied and tied the score at 23-23. Then, Indiana’s Deyshia Lofton secured a kill and an assisted block for the second Indiana set win. By the third set, the Buckeyes had had enough, and jumped out to an 8-0 lead, assisted by multiple attacking errors from the Hoosiers. It wasn’t long before sophomore setter Taylor Hughes set foot on the service line and led the team on another three-point run to make the score 14-4. The OSU kills kept rolling, as senior middle blocker Taylor Sandbothe racked up three in a row, and junior outside hitter Ashley Wenz led the set-winning attack. The Buckeyes headed into the fourth set trailing 2-1. Down for nearly the entire set, OSU gained its first lead at 14-13. The advantage changed hands briefly before the score was mirrored at 22 each. It was the Hoosiers’ Allison Hammond who slammed down two attacks in the final minutes to take the match, 25-23. Appold and Sandbothe combined for 37 kills during the match, while freshman Madison Smeathers assisted with five blocks. OSU will have a chance to redeem its loss to the Hoosiers at the final match of the regular season in front of a home crowd. Before then, the team will first face Rutgers at 7 p.m. on Friday at St. John Arena. read more

Medieval accounts from Richard IIIs rule found among job lot of 1930s

first_imgA bundle of documents bought in a job lot at a country sale in Devon have been identified as the financial accounts of Richard III from his Duchy of Cornwall estate in 1483, the year he came to the throneCredit:John Williams/SWNS A coffin containing the Plantagenet monarch’s mortal remains was taken to Leicester Cathedral to receive burial after they were discovered beneath a car park in the city in September 2012Credit:Will Johnston/Leicester Cathedral When an antiques dealer bought a box of 1930s royal memorabilia from a country house clearance he must have hoped there would be something of value in it.After all he was an experienced buyer who had made a living from spotting nuggets of gold among people’s discarded possessions.What he cannot have expected is to have unearthed a rare medieval manuscript among the coronation cups, thimbles and royalist magazines throw into the box.It has emerged that the manuscript was in fact a rare set of accounts ordered by Richard III from his lands and properties in the Duchy of Cornwall.The document is now going on sale at auction with an estimated price of between £4,000 and £6,000. A coffin containing the Plantagenet monarch's mortal remains was taken to Leicester Cathedral to receive burial after they were discovered beneath a car park in the city in September 2012 Peter Hammond, president of the Richard III society, said: “It is a very important record and we don’t know how many of these 15th century documents still exist.“It gives us a handle on the kind of income that was coming in to keep the country running. The bureaucracy was alive and well in the 15th century – they kept amazing records. Part of the newly discovered Duchy of Cornwall accounts from 1483Credit:John WIlliams/SWNS Historian hope the document will remain in Britain following the sale and be made available for public research.Mr Hammond said: “It would be good if it was bought by the Cornwall Record office or the National Archives and it would be great if people were then able to see it.”Sam Tuke, a valuer at Bonhams in Exeter, said, “It is always exciting to come acrosssomething so special. The accounts include details of properties in Devon as well as in Cornwall itself. They are of course, written in faded mediaeval Latin, but our specialists were able to decipher the text, and reveal their true value.”There are all kinds of reasons why these accounts have survived over the centuries.”They may have been lent or stolen but it is very rare to find anything like them offered for sale. The seller bought the manuscript a part of a job lot at a house clearance sale, along with royal memorabilia from the 1930s.” Richard died at Bosworth Field on August 22, 1485, in the last significant battle of the War of the Roses.Despite the lack of any concrete evidence, he was blamed for the murder of the Princes in the Tower, his nephews Edward V and brother Richard, after being appointed Protector of the Realm to the 12-year-old Edward. The seller only discovered its potential worth after asking experts at Bonhams in Exeter to take a look at the document.Following a painstaking identification the auction firm’s medieval manuscript specialists identified it as a ledger prepared for the hunchback king, covering some of the most turbulent years in English history following the start of his two year rule 1483.The papers show how much income Richard made in one year from the Duchy estate in Devon and Cornwall – and particularly from the area’s famous tin mines. Part of the newly discovered Duchy of Cornwall accounts from 1483 A bundle of documents bought in a job lot at a country sale in Devon have been identified as the financial accounts of Richard III from his Duchy of Cornwall estate in 1483, the year he came to the throne They reveal profits from the Duchy at this time were worth around £500 a year in contrast to the annual wage of a labourer of about £2.Richard III’s accounts are being put up for auction on March 21, almost three years to the day since he was reburied at Leicester Cathedral following the discovery of the remains of his body beneath a Leicester car park, on the site of the former Greyfriars Friary in Leicester which was lost during its dissolution in 1538 on the orders of Henry V111.The accounts show detailed showing totals for rents, sales and court receipts for manors within the Duchy and in Devon.Also detailed are the names of bailiffs who supervised work on the each manor and would act as a link between the serfs and their feudal lord. The amounts raised from each manorial lord amounted to between £12 and £30 per annum. The Duchy of Cornwall was created by Edward 111 in 1337 to provide income for the heir to the throne.It continues to this day as part of the extensive property holdings of Prince Charles, income from which fund both the Prince and his charitable causes.last_img read more